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Quotations From MARK TWAIN [SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS]

» More about Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] on Poemhunter

 

  • 231.
    Principles aren't of much account anyway, except at election time. After that you hang them up to let them season.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Speech, January 4, 1901. "Municipal Corruption," Mark Twain's Speeches, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1923).

    Read more quotations about / on: time
  • 232.
    Tom was a glittering hero once more—the pet of the old, the envy of the young. His name even went into immortal print, for the village paper magnified him. There were some that believed he would be President, yet, if he escaped hanging.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 24 (1876).

    Read more quotations about / on: hero
  • 233.
    The boys dressed themselves, hid their accoutrements, and went off grieving that there were no outlaws any more, and wondering what modern civilization could claim to have done to compensate for their loss. They said they would rather be outlaws a year in Sherwood Forest than President of the United States forever.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 8 (1876).

    Read more quotations about / on: loss, forest, forever
  • 234.
    All I say is, kings is kings, and you got to make allowances. Take them all around, they're a mighty ornery lot. It's the way they're raised.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Huck, in Huckleberry Finn, ch. 23 (1884).
  • 235.
    I find that principles have no real force except when one is well fed.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Adam, in "Wednesday," Extracts from Adam's Diary (1893).
  • 236.
    Martyrdom covers a multitude of sins.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Notebook, ch. 33, entry for May 23, 1903, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1935).
  • 237.
    There are no grades of vanity, there are only grades of ability in concealing it.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Notebook, ch. 31, 1898 entry, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1935).
  • 238.
    It is a time when one's spirit is subdued and sad, one knows not why; when the past seems a storm-swept desolation, life a vanity and a burden, and the future but a way to death.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author, and Charles Dudley Warner (1892-1900), U.S. author. Of Laura Hawkins's mood. The Gilded Age, ch. 60 (1873).

    Read more quotations about / on: sad, future, death, time, life
  • 239.
    The highest perfection of politeness is only a beautiful edifice, built, from the base to the dome, of ungraceful and gilded forms of charitable and unselfish lying.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "On the Decay of the Art of Lying," (written 1882), published in The Complete Humorous Sketches and Tales of Mark Twain, ed. Charles Neider (1961).

    Read more quotations about / on: beautiful
  • 240.
    Scientists have odious manners, except when you prop up their theory; then you can borrow money of them.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. repr. In Complete Essays, ed. Charles Neider (1963). The Bee (1917).

    Read more quotations about / on: money
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