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Quotations From MARGARET ANDERSON

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  • 1.
    As I look at the human story I see two stories. They run parallel and never meet. One is of people who live, as they can or must, the events that arrive; the other is of people who live, as they intend, the events they create.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Fiery Fountains, part 1 (1951). Anderson, a spirited and original personality, placed herself in the second category.

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • 2.
    Life for me has been exactly what I thought it would be—a cake, which I have eaten and had too.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Fiery Fountains, part 1 (1951). The founder and editor of an influential arts journal, The Little Review (1914-1929), Anderson—a beautiful and stylish woman—had known many important writers and artists, had lived in France for nearly twenty years, had experienced at least three great loves, had played and enjoyed fine music, and had largely managed to eke out a living without doing work that she disliked--or, much of the time, any work at all.

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 3.
    INTELLECTUALS DO NOT HAVE AESTHETIC EXPERIENCES.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Strange Necessity, part 1 (1969). Anderson referred to this as part of the "credo" for her renowned literary and arts journal, The Little Review (1914-1929).
  • 4.
    It would be ... better to be judged by one's superiors than by one's peers. ...In a trial before his superiors, any criminal would stand a chance of justice.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Strange Necessity, part 1 (1969).

    Read more quotations about / on: justice
  • 5.
    I was as repelled by the French as I was attracted by their country.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Fiery Fountains, part 1 (1951). Anderson lived in France for more than twenty years, beginning in the early 1920s. She was especially annoyed by French penuriousness.
  • 6.
    Modern photographers can reduce bones to formlessness, and change a face of the most strange, exquisite and unfathomable beauty into the face of a clubwoman.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Strange Necessity, part 1 (1969). Anderson was reacting to a type of portrait photography that was currently fashionable, and exposed, rather than idealized, the subject's face; Diane Arbus and Richard Avedon were prominent among the photographers who popularized it. Their subjects often appeared grotesque and probably looked much worse than they did in person.

    Read more quotations about / on: change, beauty
  • 7.
    I have always fought for ideas—until I learned that it isn't ideas but grief, struggle, and flashes of vision which enlighten.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Strange Necessity, part 1 (1969).

    Read more quotations about / on: grief
  • 8.
    ... today ... photographers prefer disfigurement to adornment. It is now chic to do your worst to people.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Strange Necessity, part 1 (1969). Anderson was reacting to a type of portrait photography that was currently fashionable, and exposed, rather than idealized, the subject's face; Diane Arbus and Richard Avedon were prominent among the photographers who popularized it. Their subjects often appeared grotesque and probably looked much worse than they did in person.

    Read more quotations about / on: today, people
  • 9.
    I defied nothing at all. I ignored the law because I didn't know it existed. It didn't occur to me that anyone would want to curb my inspiration.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. editor and memoirist. The Strange Necessity, part 1 (1969). For several months in the teens of the century, Anderson and a small entourage connected with The Little Review (1914-1929), an important but unremunerative arts magazine that she had founded, set up five tents on a public beach along Lake Michigan north of Chicago. They could not afford rent and had dedicated themselves to spending what little money they had on publishing the magazine. Upon its being pointed out to her later that she had "defied the law" by living on the beach, she said this.

    Read more quotations about / on: inspiration
  • 10.
    I was always pretending that I was a poor-working-girl, always forgetting that I was really poor M also a working girl.
    Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), U.S. literary editor and autobiographer. My Thirty Years' War, ch. 1 (1930). On her first full year in Chicago, as a working woman independent of her parents. Raised in affluence, she was now on her own, living hand-to-mouth as a book reviewer and literary editor.

    Read more quotations about / on: girl
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