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Quotations From LAURENCE STERNE


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  • Sciences may be learned by rote, but wisdom not.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1762), vol. 5, ch. 32, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • [I have] been in love with one princess or another almost all my life, and I hope I shall go on so, till I die, being firmly persuaded, that if ever I do a mean action, it must be in some interval betwixt one passion and another.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "Montriul," ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr. University of California Press (1967).

    Read more quotations about / on: passion, hope, love, life
  • I have always observed, when there is as much sour as sweet in a compliment, that an Englishman is eternally at a loss within himself, whether to take it, or let it alone: a Frenchman never is.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "Calais," ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).

    Read more quotations about / on: loss, alone
  • "It is with Love as with Cuckoldom"Mthe suffering party is at least the third, but generally the last in the house who knows any thing about the matter.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 8, ch. 4, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: house, love
  • It is a great pity—but 'tis certain from every day's observation of man, that he may be set on fire like a candle, at either end—provided there is a sufficient wick standing out.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 8, ch. 15, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: fire
  • So long as a man rides his Hobby-Horse peaceably and quietly along the King's highway, and neither compels you or me to get up behind him—pray, Sir, what have either you or I to do with it?
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author. Tristram Shandy, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1759-1767).

    Read more quotations about / on: horse
  • Nothing is so perfectly amusing as a total change of ideas.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author. Tristram Shandy, dedication to bk. 9 (1760-1767).

    Read more quotations about / on: change
  • In all unmerciful actions, the worst of men pay this compliment at least to humanity, as to endeavour to wear as much of the appearance of it, as the case will well let them.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. Sermons, sermon 3, "Philanthropy recommended" (1760), ed. Melvyn New, University Press of Florida (1996).
  • 'Tis no extravagant arithmetic to say, that for every ten jokes,—thou hast got an hundred enemies; and till thou hast gone on, and raised a swarm of wasps about thine ears, and art half stung to death by them, thou wilt never be convinced it is so.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author. Tristram Shandy, bk. 1, ch. 12 (1759-1767).

    Read more quotations about / on: gone, death
  • There is nothing so awkward, as courting a woman ... whilst she is making sausages.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1767), vol. 9, ch. 7, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: woman
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