Quotations From LAURENCE STERNE

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  • 31.
    Look into the world—how often do you behold a sordid wretch, whose straight heart is open to no man's affliction, taking shelter behind an appearance of piety, and putting on the garb of religion, which none but the merciful and compassionate have a title to wear.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. Sermons, sermon 3, "Philanthropy recommended" (1760), ed. Melvyn New, University Press of Florida (1996).

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  • 32.
    Writing, when properly managed (as you may be sure I think mine is) is but a different name for conversation.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author. Tristram Shandy, bk. 2, ch. 11 (1759-1767).
  • 33.
    We often think ourselves inconsistent creatures, when we are the furthest from it, and all the variety of shapes and contradictory appearances we put on, are in truth but so many different attempts to gratify the same governing appetite.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. Sermons, sermon 9, "The character of Herod" (1760), ed. Melvyn New, University Press of Florida (1996).

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  • 34.
    The proper education of poor children [is] the ground-work of almost every other kind of charity.... Without this foundation first laid, how much kindness ... is unavoidably cast away?
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. Sermons, sermon 5, "The case of Elijah and the widow of Zerephath," ed. Melvyn New, University Press of Florida (1996). First published separately in 1747.

    Read more quotations about / on: education, work, children
  • 35.
    Almost one half of our time is spent in telling and hearing evil of one another ... and every hour brings forth something strange and terrible to fill up our discourse and our astonishment.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. Sermons, sermon 18, "The Levite and his concubine" (1766), ed. Melvyn New, University Press of Florida (1996).

    Read more quotations about / on: evil, time
  • 36.
    The histories of the lives and fortunes of men are full of instances of this nature,—where favorable times and lucky accidents have done for them, what wisdom or skill could not.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. Sermons, sermon 8, "Time and chance" (1760), ed. Melvyn New, University Press of Florida (1996).

    Read more quotations about / on: nature
  • 37.
    A dwarf who brings a standard along with him to measure his own size—take my word, is a dwarf in more articles than one.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1761), vol. 3, ch. 25, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978). Tristram's explanation for why he tore a chapter—better than the rest—from his book.
  • 38.
    I am persuaded ... that both man and woman bear pain or sorrow, (and, for aught I know, pleasure too) best in a horizontal position.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1761), vol. 3, ch. 29, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: sorrow, pain, woman
  • 39.
    By this contrivance the machinery of my work is of a species by itself; two contrary motions are introduced into it, and reconciled, which were thought to be at variance with each other. In a word, my work is digressive, and it is progressive too,—and at the same time.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1760), vol. 1, ch. 22, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: work, time
  • 40.
    But the desire of knowledge, like the thirst of riches, increases ever with the acquisition of it....
    ——Endless is the Search of Truth!
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1760), vol. 2, ch. 3, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: truth
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