Treasure Island

Quotations From LAURENCE STERNE

» More about Laurence Sterne on Poemhunter

 

  • 11.
    But this is neither here nor there—why do I mention it?—Ask my pen,—it governs me,—I govern not it.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1762), vol. 6, ch. 6, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • 12.
    I pity the man who can travel from Dan to Beersheba, and cry, 'Tis all barren—and so it is; and so is all the world to him who will not cultivate the fruits it offers.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "In the Street. Calais." Ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).

    Read more quotations about / on: travel, world
  • 13.
    What a large volume of adventures may be grasped within this little span of life by him who interests his heart in every thing, and who, having eyes to see, what time and chance are perpetually holding out to him as he journeyeth on his way, misses nothing he can fairly lay his hands on.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "In the Street. Calais." Ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).

    Read more quotations about / on: heart, time, life
  • 14.
    Every thing in this world, said my father, is big with jest,—and has wit in it, and instruction too,—if we can but find it out.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1762), vol. 5, ch. 32, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: father, world
  • 15.
    But there is nothing unmixt in this world; and some of the gravest of our divines have carried it so far as to affirm, that enjoyment itself was attended even with a sigh—and that the greatest they knew of, terminated in a general way, in little better than a convulsion.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "The Passport. Versailles." Ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • 16.
    A Man's body and his mind, with the utmost reverence to both I speak it, are exactly like a jerkin, and a jerkin's lining;Mrumple the one—you rumple the other.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1761), vol. 3, ch. 4, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • 17.
    There are worse occupations in this world than feeling a woman's pulse.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author. A Sentimental Journey, "The Pulse, Paris," (1768).

    Read more quotations about / on: woman, world
  • 18.
    The circumstances with which every thing in this world is begirt, give every thing in this world its size and shape;—and by tightening it, or relaxing it, this way or that, make the thing to be, what it is—great—little—good—bad—indifferent or not indifferent, just as the case happens.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1761), vol. 3, ch. 2, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • 19.
    True Shandeism, think what you will against it, opens the heart and lungs, and like all those affections which partake of its nature, it forces the blood and other vital fluids of the body to run freely thro' its channels, and makes the wheel of life run long and chearfully round.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1761), vol. 4, ch. 32, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: heart, nature, life
  • 20.
    When the precipitancy of a man's wishes hurries on his ideas ninety times faster than the vehicle he rides in—woe be to truth!
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 7, ch. 8, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: truth
[Hata Bildir]