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Quotations From LAURENCE STERNE

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  • 1.
    Delicious essence! how refreshing art thou to nature! how strongly are all its powers and all its weaknesses on thy side! how sweetly dost thou mix with the blood, and help it through the most difficult and tortuous passages to the heart!
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "The Riddle Explained. Paris." Ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967). The author's apostrophe to flattery.

    Read more quotations about / on: heart, nature
  • 2.
    Injuries come only from the heart.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1761), vol. 3, ch. 10, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: heart
  • 3.
    So much of motion, is so much of life, and so much of joy—and ... to stand still, or get on but slowly, is death and the devil.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 7, ch. 13, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: joy, death, life
  • 4.
    An English man does not travel to see English men.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "Preface In the Desobligeant," ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).

    Read more quotations about / on: travel
  • 5.
    Thrice happy book! thou wilt have one page, at least, within thy covers, which MALICE will not blacken, and which IGNORANCE cannot misrepresent.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1762), vol. 6, ch. 38, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978). Tristram's comment on the blank page he has just inserted into his text.

    Read more quotations about / on: happy
  • 6.
    They should have wiped it up ... and said no more about it.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1762), vol. 6, ch. 12, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978). response to learning about a child prodigy who "composed a work the day he was born."
  • 7.
    There are a thousand unnoticed openings ... which let a penetrating eye at once into a man's soul; and I maintain ... that a man of sense does not lay down his hat in coming into a room,—or take it up in going out of it, but something escapes, which discovers him.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1762), vol. 6, ch. 5, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • 8.
    —My brother Toby, quoth she, is going to be married to Mrs. Wadman. "Then he will never," quoth my father, "be able to lie diagonally in his bed again as long as he lives."
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1762), vol. 6, ch. 39, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press.

    Read more quotations about / on: brother, father
  • 9.
    Hail ye small sweet courtesies of life, for smooth do ye make the road of it! like grace and beauty which beget inclinations to love at first sight; 'tis ye who open this door and let the stranger in.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "The Pulse. Paris." Ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).

    Read more quotations about / on: beauty, love, life
  • 10.
    Certainly it was ordained as a scourge upon the pride of human wisdom, that the wisest of us all, should thus outwit ourselves, and eternally forego our purposes in the intemperate act of pursuing them.
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1762), vol. 5, ch. 16, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

    Read more quotations about / on: pride
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