Quotations From JOHN KEATS

» More about John Keats on Poemhunter

 

  • For the sake of a few fine imaginative or domestic passages, are we to be bullied into a certain philosophy engendered in the whims of an egotist?
    John Keats (1705-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 3, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 44, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
  • There is an electric fire in human nature tending to purify—so that among these human creatures there is continually some birth of new heroism. The pity is that we must wonder at it, as we should at finding a pearl in rubbish.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, February 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: birth, fire, nature
  • Poetry should be great and unobtrusive, a thing which enters into one's soul, and does not startle it or amaze it with itself, but with its subject.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, February 3, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 44, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: poetry
  • My imagination is a monastery and I am its monk.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 16, 1820, to Percy Bysshe Shelley. Letters of John Keats, no. 227, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: imagination
  • I am in that temper that if I were under water I would scarcely kick to come to the top.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, May 21-25, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 66, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: water
  • I equally dislike the favour of the public with the love of a woman—they are both a cloying treacle to the wings of independence.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 23, 1819. Letters of John Keats, no. 144, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: woman, love
  • It appears to me that almost any man may like the spider spin from his own inwards his own airy citadel.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 19, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 48, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
[Hata Bildir]