Quotations From JOHN KEATS

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  • 1.
    Who would wish to be among the commonplace crowd of the little famous—who are each individually lost in a throng made up of themselves?
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 23, 1819. Letters of John Keats, no. 144, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

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  • 2.
    There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Jan. 13-19, 1818, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 37, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

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  • 3.
    Land and sea, weakness and decline are great separators, but death is the great divorcer for ever.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Sept. 30, 1820. Letters of John Keats, no. 239, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Written shortly after embarking from England on his last journey to Italy, where he succumbed to tuberculosis, Feb. 23, 1821.

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  • 4.
    With a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, December 21, 1817, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 32, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

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  • 5.
    Poetry should surprise by a fine excess and not by singularity—it should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 27, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 51, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

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  • 6.
    We hate poetry that has a palpable design upon us—and if we do not agree, seems to put its hand in its breeches pocket. Poetry should be great and unobtrusive, a thing which enters into one's soul, and does not startle it or amaze it with itself, but with its subject.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 3, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 44, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

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  • 7.
    Call the world if you please "the vale of soul-making." Then you will find out the use of the world.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, written Feb. 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

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  • 8.
    The roaring of the wind is my wife and the stars through the window pane are my children. The mighty abstract idea I have of beauty in all things stifles the more divided and minute domestic happiness.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Oct. 14-31, 1818, to his brother and sister-in-law. Letters of John Keats, no. 94, ed. Frederick Page (1954). George and Georgiana Keats, married in June of that year and recently settled in the United States, had urged the poet to think of starting a family.

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  • 9.
    You speak of Lord Byron and me—there is this great difference between us. He describes what he sees—I describe what I imagine. Mine is the hardest task.
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Sept. 17-27, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law George and Georgiana Keats. The Letters of John Keats, no. 156, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

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  • 10.
    Do you not see how necessary a world of pains and troubles is to school an intelligence and make it a soul?
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: school, world
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