Quotations From JANE AUSTEN

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  • 71.
    Shakespeare one gets acquainted with without knowing how. It is part of a British man's constitution. His thoughts and beauties are so spread abroad that one touches them every where, one is intimate with him by instinct.—No man of any brain can open at a good part of one of his plays, without falling into the flow of his meaning immediately.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Henry Crawford in Mansfield Park, ch. 34 (1814).
  • 72.
    There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Colonel Brandon in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 11 (1811).

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  • 73.
    Dress is at all times a frivolous distinction, and excessive solicitude about it often destroys its own aim.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 10 (1818).
  • 74.
    One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Elizabeth Bennet, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 40.
  • 75.
    What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. letter, Sept. 18, 1796.

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  • 76.
    Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mrs. Bennett, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 20 (1813).
  • 77.
    Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mary Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 5 (1813).

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  • 78.
    Undoubtedly ... there is a meanness in all the arts which ladies sometimes condescend to employ for captivation. What bears affinity to cunning is despicable.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 8 (1813).

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  • 79.
    It was a sweet view—sweet to the eye and the mind. British verdure, British culture, British comfort, seen under a sun bright, without being oppressive.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 42 (1816).

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  • 80.
    The ladies here probably exchanged looks which meant, "Men never know when things are dirty or not;" and the gentlemen perhaps thought each to himself, "Women will have their little nonsense and needless cares."
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 29 (1816).

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