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Quotations From JANE AUSTEN

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  • 61.
    Let no one presume to give the feelings of a young woman on receiving the assurance of that affection of which she has scarcely allowed herself to entertain a hope.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 48 (1814).

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  • 62.
    An artist cannot do anything slovenly.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Letter, November 17, 1798, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen's Letters, Oxford University Press (1952).
  • 63.
    A man would always wish to give a woman a better home than the one he takes her from; and he who can do it, where there is no doubt of her regard, must, I think, be the happiest of mortals.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. Knightley in Emma, ch. 49 (1816).

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  • 64.
    Surprizes are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. Knightley in Emma, ch. 26 (1816).
  • 65.
    One man's style must not be the rule of another's.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. Knightley in Emma, ch. 51 (1816).
  • 66.
    Fortunately for those who pay their court through such foibles, a fond mother, though, in pursuit of praise for her children, the most rapacious of human beings, is likewise the most credulous; her demands are exorbitant; but she will swallow any thing.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 21 (1811).

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  • 67.
    On every formal visit a child ought to be of the party, by way of provision for discourse.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 6 (1811).

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  • 68.
    There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Frank Churchill, in Emma, ch. 24 (1816). Emma replies, "Not till the reserve ceases towards one's self; and then the attraction may be the greater."

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  • 69.
    Like many other great moralists and preachers, she had been eloquent on a point in which her own conduct would ill bear examination.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion; of Anne Elliot, ch. 11 (1818).
  • 70.
    An engaged woman is always more agreeable than a disengaged. She is satisfied with herself. Her cares are over, and she feels that she may exert all her powers of pleasing without suspicion. All is safe with a lady engaged; no harm can be done.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Henry Crawford, in Mansfield Park, ch. 5 (1814).

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