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Quotations From JANE AUSTEN

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  • 41.
    There are certainly not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 1 (1814).

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  • 42.
    For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. Bennet, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 57 (1813).
  • 43.
    A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 6 (1813).

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  • 44.
    The younger brother must help to pay for the pleasures of the elder.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 3 (1814).

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  • 45.
    I consider a country-dance as an emblem of marriage. Fidelity and complaisance are the principle duties of both; and those men who do not choose to dance or to marry them selves, have no business with the partners or wives of the neighbors.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Henry Tilney in Northanger Abbey, ch. 10 (1818).

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  • 46.
    How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 2 (1818).
  • 47.
    It is very unfair to judge any body's conduct, without an intimate knowledge of their situation. Nobody, who has not been in the interior of a family, can say what difficulties of any individual of that family may be.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 18 (1816).

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  • 48.
    To flatter and follow others, without being flattered and followed in turn, is but a state of half enjoyment.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 24 (1818).
  • 49.
    A mind lively and at ease, can do with seeing nothing, and can see nothing that does not answer.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 27 (1816).
  • 50.
    When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's comfort.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 24 (1818).

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