Quotations From JANE AUSTEN

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  • 31.
    Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Darcy, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 10 (1813).

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  • 32.
    Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mary Crawford in Mansfield Park, ch. 7 (1814).

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  • 33.
    Where an opinion is general, it is usually correct.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mary Crawford, in Mansfield Park, ch. 11 (1814).
  • 34.
    Good-humoured, unaffected girls, will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women. They are two distinct orders of being.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Edmund Bertram in Mansfield Park, ch. 35 (1814).

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  • 35.
    There seems almost a general wish of descrying the capacity and undervaluing the labour of the novelist, and of slighting the performances which have only genius, wit, and taste to recommend them.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 5 (1818).
  • 36.
    Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 49 (1816).

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  • 37.
    One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Anne Elliot, in Persuasion, ch. 20 (1818).

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  • 38.
    To look almost pretty, is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain the first fifteen years of her life, than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 1 (1818).

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  • 39.
    Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 4 (1818).

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  • 40.
    It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Edmund, in Mansfield Park, ch. 9 (1814).

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