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Quotations From JANE AUSTEN

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  • 21.
    My idea of good company ... is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Anne, in Persuasion, ch. 16 (1818). Mr. Elliot replies, "that is not good company; that is the best."

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  • 22.
    Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial, but generally speaking it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mrs. Smith in Persuasion, ch. 17 (1818).

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  • 23.
    One has not great hopes from Birmingham. I always say there is something direful in the sound.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mrs. Elton, in Emma, ch. 36 (1816).
  • 24.
    It was the misfortune of poetry, to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly, were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Anne Elliot's thought, in Persuasion, ch. 8 (1818).

    Read more quotations about / on: poetry, alone
  • 25.
    Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or impropriety will be most endearing to the latter.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 10 (1818).

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  • 26.
    I am afraid that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Elinor, in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 13 (1811).
  • 27.
    A single woman, with a very narrow income, must be a ridiculous, disagreeable, old maid! the proper sport of boys and girls; but a single woman, of good fortune, is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as anybody else.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 10 (1816).

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  • 28.
    The post-office had a great charm at one period of our lives. When you have lived to my age, you will begin to think letters are never worth going through the rain for.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. John Knightley, in Emma, ch. 34 (1816).

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  • 29.
    The trees, though not fully clothed, were in that delightful state, when further beauty is known to be at hand, and when, while much is actually given to the sight, more yet remains for the imagination.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 46 (1814).

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  • 30.
    Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mrs. Norris in Mansfield Park, ch. 1 (1814).

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