Quotations From JANE AUSTEN


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  • Vanity working on a weak head, produces every sort of mischief.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. Knightley in Emma, ch. 8 (1816).
  • With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. John Knightley, in Emma, ch. 13 (1816). Describing Mr. Elton.
  • You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Mr. Bennet, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 1 (1813). In answer to Mrs. Bennet's accusation that he had "no compassion on my poor nerves."

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  • A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Miss Bingley, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 10 (1813).
  • But Shakespeare one gets acquainted with without knowing how. It is a part of an Englishman's constitution. His thoughts and beauties are so spread abroad that one touches them everywhere; one is intimate with him by instinct.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Henry Crawford, in Mansfield Park, ch. 34 (1814).
  • I am pleased that you have learned to love a hyacinth. The mere habit of learning to love is the thing; and a teachableness of disposition in a young lady is a great blessing.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Henry Tilney in Northanger Abbey, ch. 22 (1818).

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  • It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;Mit is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 12 (1811).

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  • Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as soon as I can, impatient to restore every body, not greatly in fault themselves, to tolerable comfort, and to have done with all the rest.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 48 (1814).

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  • It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Pride and Prejudice, ch. 1 (1813). Opening words.

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  • Where youth and diffidence are united, it requires uncommon steadiness of reason to resist the attraction of being called the most charming girl in the world.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Northanger Abbey, ch. 7 (1818).

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