Quotations From JAMES JOYCE

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  • 21.
    He even ran away with hunself and became a farsoonerite, saying he would far sooner muddle through the hash of lentils in Europe than meddle with Irrland's split little pea.
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section vi, Penguin (1976). Shem the Penman's exile in Europe.
  • 22.
    Do fish ever get seasick.
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 13, "Nausicaa," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). One of Leopold Bloom's random questions during the day.

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  • 23.
    So you need hardly spell me how every word will be bound over to carry three score and ten toptypsical readings throughout the book of Doublends Jined.
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section i, Penguin (1976). The way meaning is derived in Finnegans Wake, which joins the ends of the story of Dublin and environs in the manner of a Mobius strip.
  • 24.
    Why the title Exiles? A nation exacts a penance from those who dared leave her payable on their return.
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Exiles, Appendix of "Notes by the author," Exiles, introduction by Padraic Colum, Viking (1951). These notes were written in a copy-book Joyce prepared while writing the play.

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  • 25.
    Three quarks for Muster Mark!
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, pt. 2 (1939). This seabirds' chorus provided the name for the hypothetical particle postulated by physicists Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1963.
  • 26.
    The pleasures of love lasts but a fleeting but the pledges of life outlusts a lieftime.
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part III, section ii, Penguin (1976). One of Joyce's key thematic statements about the nature of love, narrative and human bonds.

    Read more quotations about / on: love, life
  • 27.
    And the first till last alshemist wrote over every square inch of the only foolscap available, his own body, till by its corrosive sublimation one continuous present tense integument slowly unfolded all marryvoising moodmoulded cyclewheeling history....
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section vi, Penguin (1976). Shem the Penman's story becomes the story of the race, as is the case for the story of the artist in all of Joyce's works.

    Read more quotations about / on: history
  • 28.
    His unremitting intellect is the hornmad Iago ceaselessly willing that the moor in him shall suffer.
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 9, "Scylla and Charybdis," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Stephen Dedalus on Shakespeare and jealousy.
  • 29.
    If Ireland is to become a new Ireland she must first become European.
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Exiles, Act I, Exiles, introduction by Padraic Colum, Viking (1951). Joyce generally agrees with this sentiment, though it is voiced in the play by Robert, who is, in many respects, contemptible.
  • 30.
    A corpse is meat gone bad. Well and what's cheese? Corpse of milk.
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 6, "Hades," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). One of Leopold Bloom's unsentimental and witty interior thoughts.

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