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Quotations From HONORÉ DE BALZAC

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  • 31.
    The questioning spirit is the rebellious spirit. A rebellion is always either a cloak to hide a prince, or the swaddling wrapper of a new rule.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. (1846, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). About Catherine of Medici, First published in book form as Catherine de Medici expliquée, Souverain (1843), It was subsequently included in the Conte et romans philosophiques, in the Etudes philsophique, and finally in the Comédie humaine. Balzac's judgement on Catherine de Medici.
  • 32.
    The most virtuous women have something within them, something that is never chaste.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. The Physiology of Marriage, Meditation Number IV, Canel (1829). Balzac's generalizations about virtuous women.

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  • 33.
    Peter the Hermit, Calvin, and Robespierre, sons of the same soil, at intervals of three centuries were, in a political sense, the levers of Archimedes. Each in turn was an embodied idea finding its fulcrum in the interests of man.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. (1846, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). About Catherine of Medici, first published in book form as Catherine de Medici expliquée, Souverain (1843). It was subsequently included in the Conte et romans philosophiques, in the Etudes philsophique, and finally in the Comédie humaine.
  • 34.
    What is a child, monsieur, but the image of two beings, the fruit of two sentiments spontaneously blended?
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. The Marquise d'Aiglemont, in A Woman of Thirty, in The Works of Honoré de Balzac, vol. V, trans. by George Saintsbury (1971).

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  • 35.
    Lovers have a way of using this word "nothing" which implies exactly the opposite.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Then in vol. I, ch. VII, of the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator, in A Daughter of Eve (Une Fille d'Eve), published with Massimilla Doni, Souverain (1839), first appeared in Le Siècle (1838-1839).
  • 36.
    It would be curious to know what leads a man to become a stationer rather than a baker, when he is no longer compelled, as among the Egyptians, to succeed to his father's craft.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, first part was published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabo.

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  • 37.
    A grocer is attracted to his business by a magnetic force as great as the repulsion which renders it odious to artists.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, first part published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabouill.
  • 38.
    A widow has two duties of a contradictory nature—she is a mother, and she ought to exert a father's power.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, the first part was published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabo.

    Read more quotations about / on: father, mother, power, nature
  • 39.
    Music is of two kinds: one petty, poor, second-rate, never varying, its base the hundred or so phrasings which all musicians understand, a babbling which is more or less pleasant, the life that most composers live.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. In The Works of Honoré de Balzac, vol. IV, trans. by George Saintsbury (1971). Massimilla's observation, in Massimilla Doni.

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  • 40.
    A husband who submits to his wife's yoke is justly held an object of ridicule. A woman's influence ought to be entirely concealed.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. de l'Estorade in a letter to Mlle. De Chaulieu, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).

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