Quotations From HONORÉ DE BALZAC

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  • 11.
    But reason always cuts a poor figure beside sentiment; the one being essentially restricted, like everything that is positive, while the other is infinite.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Woman of Thirty, The Works of Honoré de Balzac, vol. V, trans. by George Saintsbury (1971).
  • 12.
    The man whose action habitually bears the stamp of his mind is a genius, but the greatest genius is not always equal to himself, or he would cease to be human.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Then in vol. I, ch. III, of the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator, in A Daughter of Eve (Une Fille d'Eve), published with Massimilla Doni, Souverain (1839), first appeared in Le Siècle (1838-1839).
  • 13.
    Women are tenacious, and all of them should be tenacious of respect; without esteem they cannot exist; esteem is the first demand that they make of love.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Woman of Thirty, in The Works of Honoré de Balzac, vol. V, trans. by George Saintsbury (1971).

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  • 14.
    Between the daylight gambler and the player at night there is the same difference that lies between a careless husband and the lover swooning under his lady's window.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Later appeared as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), and part of the Etudes philosophiques (1831). It then entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator, in The Wild Ass's Skin (La Peau de chagrin), which was first published by Gosselin (1831).

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  • 15.
    There is something great and terrible about suicide.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Later appeared as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), and part of the Etudes philosophiques (1831). It then entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator, in The Wild Ass's Skin (La Peau de chagrin), which was first published by Gosselin (1831).

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  • 16.
    The truest splendors are not in outward things, but in ourselves.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. It later entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator's observation, in Seraphita, chapter III, First published as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), then the Etudes philosophiques (1835).
  • 17.
    They [twin beds] are the most stupid, the most perfidious, and the most dangerous invention in the world. Shame and a curse on who thought of them.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Meditation Number XVII, Canel (1829). Balzac's generalizations about twin beds.

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  • 18.
    Ideas devour the ages as men are devoured by their passions. When man is cured, human nature will cure itself perhaps.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. (1846, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). About Catherine of Medici, First published in book form as Catherine de Medici expliquée, Souverain (1843), It was subsequently included in the Conte et romans philosophiques, in the Etudes philsophique, and finally in the Comédie humaine. Balzac's judgement.

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  • 19.
    A man is a poor creature compared to a woman.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Then in vol. I, ch. IX, of the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Vandenesse, in A Daughter of Eve (Une Fille d'Eve), published with Massimilla Doni, Souverain (1839), first appeared in Le Siècle (1838-1839).

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  • 20.
    Conscience is our unerring judge until we finally stifle it.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Later appeared as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), and part of the Etudes philosophiques (1831). It then entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Rastignac, in The Wild Ass's Skin (La Peau de chagrin), which was first published by Gosselin (1831).
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