Quotations From HENRY MILLER

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  • 1.
    History is the myth, the true myth, of man's fall made manifest in time.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. Plexus, ch. 12 (1949).

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  • 2.
    Life is constantly providing us with new funds, new resources, even when we are reduced to immobility. In life's ledger there is no such thing as frozen assets.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. Quiet Days in Clichy, 1991 edition, p. 33 (orig. publ. 1956).

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  • 3.
    It isn't the oceans which cut us off from the world—it's the American way of looking at things.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "Letter to Lafayette," The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945).

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  • 4.
    It is true I swim in a perpetual sea of sex but the actual excursions are fairly limited.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. letter, Feb. 1, 1932. Letters to Anaïs Nin, pt. 1 (1965).

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  • 5.
    One becomes aware in France, after having lived in America, that sex pervades the air. It's there all around you, like a fluid.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. Interview in Writers at Work, Second Series, ed. George Plimpton (1963).

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  • 6.
    Man has demonstrated that he is master of everything—except his own nature.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "With Edgar Varèse in the Gobi Desert," The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945).

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  • 7.
    Reality is not protected or defended by laws, proclamations, ukases, cannons and armadas. Reality is that which is sprouting all the time out of death and disintegration.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "With Edgar Varèse in the Gobi Desert," The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945).

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  • 8.
    It is the American vice, the democratic disease which expresses its tyranny by reducing everything unique to the level of the herd.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "Raimu," The Wisdom of the Heart (1947).
  • 9.
    The Frenchman is first and foremost a man. He is likeable often just because of his weaknesses, which are always thoroughly human, even if despicable.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "Raimu," The Wisdom of the Heart (1947).
  • 10.
    One can be absolutely truthful and sincere even though admittedly the most outrageous liar. Fiction and invention are of the very fabric of life.
    Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "Reflections on Writing," The Wisdom of the Heart (1947).

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