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Quotations From GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON

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  • One may understand the cosmos, but never the ego; the self is more distant than any star.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Logic of Elfland," Orthodoxy (1908).

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  • There are many definite methods, honest and dishonest, which make people rich; the only "instinct" I know of which does it is that instinct which theological Christianity crudely describes as "the sin of avarice."
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Fallacy of Success," All Things Considered (1908).

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  • Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Policeman, in The Man Who Was Thursday, ch. 4 (1908).

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  • When we really worship anything, we love not only its clearness but its obscurity. We exult in its very invisibility.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Fallacy of Success," All Things Considered (1908).

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  • Man seems to be capable of great virtues but not of small virtues; capable of defying his torturer but not of keeping his temper.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Autobiography, ch. 11 (1936).
  • The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one's own country as a foreign land.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Tremendous Trifles, "The Riddle of the Ivy," (1909).

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  • The dignity of the artist lies in his duty of keeping awake the sense of wonder in the world. In this long vigil he often has to vary his methods of stimulation; but in this long vigil he is also himself striving against a continual tendency to sleep.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Maltreating Words," Generally Speaking (1928).

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  • The Museum is not meant either for the wanderer to see by accident or for the pilgrim to see with awe. It is meant for the mere slave of a routine of self-education to stuff himself with every sort of incongruous intellectual food in one indigestible meal.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Sightseeing," All Is Grist (1931).

    Read more quotations about / on: food, education
  • The only way of catching a train I have ever discovered is to miss the train before.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Tremendous Trifles, "The Prehistoric Railway Station," (1909).

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  • Ritual will always mean throwing away something: destroying our corn or wine upon the altar of our gods.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Secret of a Train," Tremendous Trifles (1909).
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