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Quotations From GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON


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  • The vulgar man is always the most distinguished, for the very desire to be distinguished is vulgar.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Boy," All Things Considered (1908).
  • Compromise used to mean that half a loaf was better than no bread. Among modern statesmen it really seems to mean that half a loaf is better than a whole loaf.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. What's Wrong with the World, ch. 3 (1910).
  • Buddhism is not a creed, it is a doubt.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Professor de Worms, in The Man Who Was Thursday, ch. 14 (1908).
  • The mere brute pleasure of reading—the sort of pleasure a cow must have in grazing.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Quoted in Dudley Barker, G.K. Chesterton (1973).
  • I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act; but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Holland," Generally Speaking (1928).

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  • The true object of all human life is play. Earth is a task garden; heaven is a playground.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Oxford from Without," All Things Considered (1908).

    Read more quotations about / on: heaven, life
  • The cosmos is about the smallest hole that a man can hide his head in.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Orthodoxy, ch. 1 (1909).
  • Courage is almost a contradiction in terms. It means a strong desire to live taking the form of a readiness to die.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Orthodoxy, ch. 6 (1909).

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  • Journalism is popular, but it is popular mainly as fiction. Life is one world, and life seen in the newspapers another.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On the Cryptic and the Elliptic," All Things Considered (1908).

    Read more quotations about / on: life, world
  • A puritan is a person who pours righteous indignation into the wrong things.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. New York Times (Nov. 21, 1930).
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