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Quotations From GEORGE GORDON NOEL BYRON

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  • 21.
    There is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever. Besides, who would ever shave themselves in such a state?
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, July 5, 1821, to poet Thomas Moore. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 8 (1973-1981).

    Read more quotations about / on: fever, passion, life
  • 22.
    I like his holiness very much, particularly since an order, which I understand he has lately given, that no more miracles shall be performed.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. repr. In Doris Langley Moore, The Late Lord Byron, ch. 10 (1961, revised 1976). Quoted in James Kennedy, Conversations on Religion with Lord Byron (1830).
  • 23.
    A Republic! Look in the history of the Earth ... To be the first man—not the Dictator, not the Sylla, but the Washington or the Aristides, the leader in talent and truth—is next to the Divinity!
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 3, entry for Nov. 23, 1813, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1974).

    Read more quotations about / on: history, truth
  • 24.
    The "good old times"Mall times when old are good.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. The Age of Bronze, l. 1 (1823).
  • 25.
    The best way will be to avoid each other without appearing to do so—or if we jostle, at any rate not to bite.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, April 25, 1814, referring to his affair with Lady Caroline Lamb. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 4, ed. Leslie Marchand (1975).
  • 26.
    I am sure of nothing so little as my own intentions.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. letter, Jan. 20, 1811. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 2, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1973-1981).
  • 27.
    The reading or non-reading a book will never keep down a single petticoat.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. letter, Oct. 29, 1819. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 6, ed. Leslie A Marchand (1976). Referring to Byron's poem, Don Juan, which women had been warned not to read.
  • 28.
    Why I came here, I know not; where I shall go it is useless to enquire—in the midst of myriads of the living & the dead worlds, stars, systems, infinity, why should I be anxious about an atom?
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, March 3, 1814, to Annabella Milbanke, later Lady Byron. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 4, ed. Leslie Marchand (1975).
  • 29.
    I have had, and may have still, a thousand friends, as they are called, in life, who are like one's partners in the waltz of this world—not much remembered when the ball is over.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. letter, Nov. 16, 1822, to Mary Shelley. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 10, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1973-1981).

    Read more quotations about / on: world, life
  • 30.
    But hatred is a much more delightful passion & never cloys; it will make us all happy for the rest of our lives.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, April 19, 1813. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 3, ed. Leslie Marchand (1974).

    Read more quotations about / on: passion, happy
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