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Quotations From GEORGE ELIOT [MARY ANN (OR MARIAN) EVANS]

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  • Is it not rather what we expect in men, that they should have numerous strands of experience lying side by side and never compare them with each other?
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Middlemarch, bk. 6, ch. 58 (1871-1872).
  • The only failure a man ought to fear is failure in cleaving to the purpose he sees to be best.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Felix Holt, in Felix Holt, The Radical, ch. 45 (1866).

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  • You have such strong words at command, that they make the smallest argument seem formidable.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Esther to Felix, in Felix Holt, The Radical, ch. 5 (1866).
  • One must be poor to know the luxury of giving!
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, bk. 2, ch. 17 (1871-1872).
  • It is painful to be told that anything is very fine and not be able to feel that it is fine—something like being blind, while people talk of the sky.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Dorothea Brooke Casaubon, the heroine of Middlemarch, ch. 21 (1871-1872). About art criticism.

    Read more quotations about / on: sky, people
  • People glorify all sorts of bravery except the bravery they might show on behalf of their nearest neighbours.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 72 (1871-1872).

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