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Quotations From GEORGE ELIOT [MARY ANN (OR MARIAN) EVANS]

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  • 151.
    To act with doubleness towards a man whose own conduct was double, was so near an approach to virtue that it deserved to be called by no meaner name than diplomacy.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Felix Holt, The Radical, ch. 29 (1866). Commenting on the hypocrisy and corruption present in politics at the time of the first Reform Bill (1832), real name: Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.
  • 152.
    Life is measured by the rapidity of change, the succession of influences that modify the being.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Felix Holt, the Radical, ch. 48 (1866).

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  • 153.
    Plain women he regarded as he did the other severe facts of life, to be faced with philosophy and investigated by science.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 11 (1871-1872). Of Lydgate, a young doctor in the novel.

    Read more quotations about / on: women, life
  • 154.
    No compliment can be eloquent, except as an expression of indifference.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Maggie Tulliver, in The Mill on the Floss, bk. 6, ch. 2 (1860). Responding to Stephen Guest's compliment on their first encounter.
  • 155.
    Worldly faces never look so worldly as at a funeral. They have the same effect of grating incongruity as the sound of a coarse voice breaking the solemn silence of night.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. repr. In Scenes of Clerical Life (1858). Janet's Repentance, ch. 25, Blackwood's Magazine (1857). Pseudonym of Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.

    Read more quotations about / on: funeral, silence, night
  • 156.
    Few women, I fear, have had such reason as I have to think the long sad years of youth were worth living for the sake of middle age.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. letter, Dec. 31, 1857. George Eliot's Life as Related in Her Letters and Journals (1900).

    Read more quotations about / on: sad, fear, women
  • 157.
    There is a sort of subjection which is the peculiar heritage of largeness and of love; and strength is often only another name for willing bondage to irremediable weakness.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Felix Holt, The Radical, ch. 5 (1866).

    Read more quotations about / on: strength, love
  • 158.
    Our impartiality is kept for abstract merit and demerit, which none of us ever saw.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Middlemarch, bk. 4, ch. 40 (1871).
  • 159.
    Harold, like the rest of us, had many impressions which saved him the trouble of distinct ideas.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Felix Holt, The Radical, ch. 47 (1866). Said of Harold Transome; real name is Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.
  • 160.
    Does any one suppose that private prayer is necessarily candid—necessarily goes to the roots of action! Private prayer is inaudible speech, and speech is representative: who can represent himself just as he is, even in his own reflections?
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 70 (1871-1872).
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