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Quotations From GEORGE ELIOT [MARY ANN (OR MARIAN) EVANS]


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  • A difference of tastes in jokes is a great strain on the affections.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Daniel Deronda, bk. 2, ch. 15 (1874-1876).
  • ... we are most of us brought up in the notion that the highest motive for not doing a wrong is something irrespective of the beings who would suffer the wrong.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 24, 1871-1872.
  • But that intimacy of mutual embarrassment, in which each feels that the other is feeling something, having once existed, its effect is not to be done away with.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Middlemarch, bk. 3, ch. 27 (1871). Of Rosamund and Lydgate.
  • ... blameless people are always the most exasperating!
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 12 (1871-1872). ....

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  • Vanity is as ill at ease under indifference as tenderness is under a love which it cannot return.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 1, ch. 10 (1876).

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  • For what is love itself, for the one we love best?—an enfolding of immeasurable cares which yet are better than any joys outside our love.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 8, ch. 69 (1876).

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  • ... people are almost always better than their neighbours think they are.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 72 (1871-1872).

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  • In the schoolroom her quick mind had taken readily that strong starch of unexplained rules and disconnected facts which saves ignorance from any painful sense of limpness.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 1, ch. 4 (1876). Referring to Gwendolen Harleth.
  • When we get to wishing a great deal for ourselves, whatever we get soon turns into mere limitation and exclusion.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 2, ch. 14 (1876).
  • ... to most mortals there is a stupidity which is unendurable and a stupidity which is altogether acceptable—else, indeed, what would become of social bonds?
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 58 (1871-1872).
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