Quotations From FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE


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  • However closely people are attached to one another, their mutual horizon nonetheless includes all four compass directions, and now and again they notice it.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 661, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 245, "In Intimate Company," (1880).

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  • The sick are parasites on society. In a certain state it is indecent to go on living. To continue vegetating in cowardly dependence on physicians and machinations once the meaning of life, the right to life, has been lost ought to occasion a deep contempt within society.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 6, p. 134, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Twilight of the Idols, "Skirmishes of an Untimely Man," section 36 (prepared for publication 1888, published 1889).

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  • Belief in the truth commences with the doubting of all those "truths" we once believed.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 387, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 20, "Truth Will Have No Other Gods Alongside It," (1879).

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  • Someone said: "I have been prejudiced against myself from my earliest childhood: hence I find some truth in all blame and some stupidity in all praise. I generally estimate praise too poorly and blame too highly."
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 665, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 262, "Prejudiced," (1880).

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  • In the last analysis, even the best man is evil: in the last analysis, even the best woman is bad.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 200, selection 5[1], number 118, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra; foreshadows the distinction between master morality ("good/bad") and slave morality ("good/evil") developed in Nietzsche's observations On the Genealogy of Morals.

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  • Whoever despises himself nonetheless respects himself as one who despises.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 5, p. 87, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 78 (1886).
  • Yet for all that, there is nothing in me of a founder of a religion—religions are affairs of the rabble; I find it necessary to wash my hands after I have come into contact with religious people.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 6, p. 365, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo, p. 326, trans. by Walter Kaufmann, New York, Vintage Books (1967). Ecce Homo, "Why I Am a Destiny," section 1 (prepared for publication 1888, published posthumously 1908). A self-assessment appearing in Nietzsche's spiritual autobiography.

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  • In every party there is one person who, through his dotingly credulous enunciation of party principles, incites the other members to defection.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 240, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man in Society," aphorism 298, "The Most Dangerous Partisan," (1878).
  • The irrationality of a thing is no argument against its existence, rather a condition of it.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 323, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man Alone With Himself," aphorism 515, "From Experience," (1878).
  • When I contemplated purpose I also contemplated chance and foolishness.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 217, selection 5[1], number 252, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra.
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