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Quotations From F. SCOTT FITZGERALD


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  • Riches have never fascinated me, unless combined with the greatest charm or distinction.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. letter, Aug. 1936, to Ernest Hemingway. The Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald, ed. Andrew Turnbull (1963). Fitzgerald was defending himself against an attack by Hemingway in "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" published in Esquire of that month, in which he named Fitzgerald as feeling a "romantic awe" for the rich. When the story was collected in The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories in 1938, Fitzgerald became the character "Julian." Also see Hemingway's comment under rich, the.
  • I hate the place like poison with a sincere hatred.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Letter, January 10, 1935, to his agent. Published in As Ever, Scott Fitz, ed. Matthew J. Bruccoli (1973). Replying to a suggestion that Fitzgerald should return to Hollywood to work on a script of Tender Is the Night.

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  • It's not a slam at you when people are rude—it's a slam at the people they've met before.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Cecilia Brady, in The Last Tycoon, ch. 1 (1941).

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  • Life is essentially a cheat and its conditions are those of defeat ... the redeeming things are not "happiness and pleasure" but the deeper satisfactions that come out of struggle.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Letter, October 5, 1940, to his daughter Frances Scott Fitzgerald. The Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald, ed. Andrew Turnbull (1963).

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  • Speech is an arrangement of notes that will never be played again.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. The narrator (Nick Carraway), in The Great Gatsby, ch. 1 (1925). Describing Daisy Buchanan's "low, thrilling voice ... the kind of voice that the ear follows up and down."
  • It occurred to me that there was no difference between men, in intelligence or race, so profound as the difference between the sick and the well.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Nick Carraway, in The Great Gatsby, ch. 7 (1925). He is the narrator.

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  • His life was a sort of dream, as are most lives with the mainspring left out.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Notebook C," The Crack-Up, ed. by Edmund Wilson (1945).

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  • Her unselfishness came in pretty small packages well wrapped.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Notebook E," The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).
  • Grown up, and that is a terribly hard thing to do. It is much easier to skip it and go from one childhood to another.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Notebook E," The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).

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  • Genius goes around the world in its youth incessantly apologizing for having large feet. What wonder that later in life it should be inclined to raise those feet too swiftly to fools and bores.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Notebook E," The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).

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