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Quotations From F. SCOTT FITZGERALD

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  • 11.
    The faces of most American women over thirty are relief maps of petulant and bewildered unhappiness.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. letter, later dated Oct. 5, 1940, to his daughter Frances Scott Fitzgerald. The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).

    Read more quotations about / on: women
  • 12.
    Cut out all these exclamation points. An exclamation point is like laughing at your own joke.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Quoted in Sheilah Graham and Gerold Frank, Beloved Infidel, ch. 18 (1958).

    Read more quotations about / on: cut
  • 13.
    Sometimes I think that idlers seem to be a special class for whom nothing can be planned, plead as one will with them—their only contribution to the human family is to warm a seat at the common table.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Letter, July 7, 1938, to his daughter, Frances "Scottie" Fitzgerald. The Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald, ed. Andrew Turnbull (1963).

    Read more quotations about / on: family, sometimes
  • 14.
    Poetry is either something that lives like fire inside you—like music to the musician or Marxism to the Communist—or else it is nothing, an empty formalized bore around which pedants can endlessly drone their notes and explanations.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Letter, August 3, 1940, to his daughter Frances Scott Fitzgerald. The Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald, ed. Andrew Turnbull (1963).

    Read more quotations about / on: empty, music, poetry, fire
  • 15.
    In a real dark night of the soul it is always three o'clock in the morning, day after day.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945). Handle With Care, first published in Esquire (New York, March 1936). The article constituted the second part of Fitzgerald's Crack-Up series. The Dark Night of the Soul is the title of a poem and commentary by the 16th-century Spanish mystic San Juan de la Cruz (St. John of the Cross).

    Read more quotations about / on: dark, night
  • 16.
    Trouble has no necessary connection with discouragement—discouragement has a germ of its own, as different from trouble as arthritis is different from a stiff joint.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. repr. In The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945). "Handle With Care," Esquire (New York, March 1936). As second part of Fitzgerald's Crack-Up series.
  • 17.
    His was a great sin who first invented consciousness. Let us lose it for a few hours.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. John, in The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, ch. 11 (1922). Uttered before falling asleep.
  • 18.
    In a real dark night of the soul it is always three o'clock in the morning, day after day.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945). Handle With Care, first published in Esquire (New York, March 1936). The article constituted the second part of Fitzgerald's Crack-Up series. The Dark Night of the Soul is the title of a poem and commentary by the 16th-century Spanish mystic San Juan de la Cruz (St. John of the Cross).

    Read more quotations about / on: dark, night
  • 19.
    Everybody's youth is a dream, a form of chemical madness.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. John, in The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, ch. 11 (1922). Kismine replies, "How pleasant then to be insane!"

    Read more quotations about / on: dream
  • 20.
    At any rate, let us love for a while, for a year or so, you and me. That's a form of divine drunkenness that we can all try.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. John to Kismine, in The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, ch. 11 (1922).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
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