Quotations From EDMUND BURKE

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  • 1.
    Flattery corrupts both the receiver and the giver.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).
  • 2.
    To drive men from independence to live on alms, is itself great cruelty.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).
  • 3.
    To make us love our country, our country ought to be lovely.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).

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  • 4.
    Superstition is the religion of feeble minds.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), repr. In Works, vol. 3 (1865).
  • 5.
    Whenever our neighbour's house is on fire, it cannot be amiss for the engines to play a little on our own.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), repr. In Works, vol. 3 (1865).

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  • 6.
    Learning will be cast into the mire, and trodden down under the hoofs of a swinish multitude.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), repr. In Works, vol. 3 (1865).
  • 7.
    When the leaders choose to make themselves bidders at an auction of popularity, their talents, in the construction of the state, will be of no service. They will become flatterers instead of legislators; the instruments, not the guides, of the people.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).

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  • 8.
    Nobility is a graceful ornament to the civil order. It is the Corinthian capital of polished society.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), repr. In Works, vol. 3 (1865).
  • 9.
    A state without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish Protestant political writer. Reflections on the Revolution in France, p. 19, ed. Pocock (1790).

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  • 10.
    A spirit of innovation is generally the result of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to posterity, who never look backward to their ancestors.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish Protestant political writer. Reflections on the Revolution in France, p. 29, ed. Pocock (1790).

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