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Quotations From EDGAR ALLAN POE

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  • 31.
    If the propositions of this Discourse are tenable, the "state of progressive collapse" is precisely that state in which alone we are warranted in considering All Things.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). The cosmos collapsing into the "original unity."

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  • 32.
    The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins?
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. The Premature Burial (1844).

    Read more quotations about / on: death, life
  • 33.
    Beauty of whatever kind, in its supreme development, invariably excites the sensitive soul to tears.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. "The Rationale of Verse," The Pioneer (March 1843).

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  • 34.
    If I venture to displace ... the microscopical speck of dust... on the point of my finger,... I have done a deed which shakes the Moon in her path, which causes the Sun to be no longer the Sun, and which alters forever the destiny of multitudinous myriads of stars.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). Prefiguring the "butterfly effect."

    Read more quotations about / on: sun, destiny, forever, moon
  • 35.
    Let us dismiss, as irrelevant to the poem per se, the circumstance ... which, in the first place, gave rise to the intention of composing a poem that should suit at once the popular and the critical taste.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Philosophy of Composition," Graham's Magazine (1846). Disingenuously dismissing private motives.

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  • 36.
    He must be theory-mad beyond redemption who ... shall ... persist in attempting to reconcile the obstinate oils and waters of Poetry and Truth.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Poetic Principle," Sartain's (1850). Self-division precipitating disintegration.

    Read more quotations about / on: poetry, truth
  • 37.
    We have ... a thirst unquenchable, to allay which he has not shown us the crystal springs. This thirst belongs to the immortality of Man.... It is no mere appreciation of the Beauty before us—but a wild effort to reach the Beauty above.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Poetic Principle," Sartain's (1850). Other-worldly beauty—Poe's first and enduring love.

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  • 38.
    As an individual, I myself feel impelled to fancy ... a limitless succession of Universes.... Each exists, apart and independently, in the bosom of its proper and particular God.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). Sealing the universe from noxious influences.

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  • 39.
    Believe me, there exists no such dilemma as that in which a gentleman is placed when he is forced to reply to a blackguard.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. letter, Jan. 4, 1848. Julian Symons, The Tell-Tale Heart: The Life and Works of Edgar Allan Poe, pt. 1, ch. 13 (1978).

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  • 40.
    The Bostonians are really, as a race, far inferior in point of anything beyond mere intellect to any other set upon the continent of North America. They are decidedly the most servile imitators of the English it is possible to conceive.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. letter, Feb. 14, 1849.

    Read more quotations about / on: america
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