Quotations From DAVID HUME

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  • 31.
    There is a very remarkable inclination in human nature to bestow on external objects the same emotions which it observes in itself, and to find every where those ideas which are most present to it.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. A Treatise of Human Nature, bk. 1, part 4, sect. 3, p. 224, ed. P. Nidditch, 2nd edition, New York, Oxford University Press (1978).

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  • 32.
    The great subverter of Pyrrhonism or the excessive principles of scepticism is action, and employment, and the occupations of common life.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, sec. xii, part 2, pp. 158-159, ed. Selby-Bigge, Oxford (1951).

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  • 33.
    The whole [of religion] is a riddle, an ænigma, an inexplicable mystery. Doubt, uncertainty, suspence of judgment appear the only result of our most accurate scrutiny, concerning this subject.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher, historian, embassy secretary. The Natural History of Religion, last paragraph (1757).
  • 34.
    [Rousseau] has not had the precaution to throw any veil over his sentiments; and as he scorns to dissemble his contempt of established opinions, he could not wonder that all the zealots were in arms against him.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. Letters of David Hume, vol. 1, p. 374, ed. J. Grieg, Oxford (1932).
  • 35.
    Absolute monarchy,... is the easiest death, the true Euthanasia of the BRITISH constitution.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. Essays Moral, Political, and Literary, part I, E. VII ("Whether the British Government inclines more to Absolute Monarchy, or to a Republic"), p. 51, ed. Eugene F. Miller, revised edition, Indianapolis, Liberty Fund, Inc. (1987).

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  • 36.
    A hundred cabinet-makers in London can work a table or a chair equally well; but no one poet can write verses with such spirit and elegance as Mr. Pope.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. "Of Eloquence," part I, essay XII, p. 99, Essays Moral, Political, and Literary, ed. Eugene F. Miller, revised edition, Indianapolis, Liberty Fund, Inc. (1987).

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  • 37.
    Virtue, like wholesome food, is better than poisons, however corrected.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. "Of Refinement in the Arts," part II, essay II, p. 279, Essays Moral, Political, and Literary, ed. Eugene F. Miller, revised edition, Indianapolis, Liberty Fund, Inc. (1987).

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  • 38.
    Human Nature is the only science of man; and yet has been hitherto the most neglected.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. A Treatise of Human Nature, bk. 1, part 4, sect. 7, p. 264, ed. P. Nidditch, 2nd edition, New York, Oxford University Press (1978).

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  • 39.
    Reason is, and ought only to be, the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office than to serve and obey them.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. A Treatise of Human Nature, bk. 2, part 3, sect. 3, p. 414, ed. P. Nidditch, 2nd edition, New York, Oxford University Press (1978).
  • 40.
    Be a philosopher; but, amidst all your philosophy, be still a man.
    David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. Enquiries Concerning Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals, sect. 1 ("Of the Different Species of Philosophy"), p. 9, ed. L. Selby-Bigge, M.A., 2nd edition, London, Oxford University Press (1902). From "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding."
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