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Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

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  • 31.
    She knew that the horse, born to serve nobly, had waited in vain for someone noble to serve. His spirit knew that nobility had gone out of men.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by M. Secker (1925). St. Mawr, p. 76, Vintage Books (1959). "she" is Lou Witt, thinking of St. Mawr.

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  • 32.
    Tragedy is like strong acid—it dissolves away all but the very gold of truth.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. letter, Apr. 1, 1911. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 1, ed. James T. Boulton (1979).

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  • 33.
    I always feel as if I stood naked for the fire of Almighty God to go through me—and it's rather an awful feeling. One has to be so terribly religious to be an artist.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. The Letters of D. H. Lawrence, p. 109, letter, Feb. 24, 1913, to Ernest Collings, Heinemann (1932).

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  • 34.
    Ours is an excessively conscious age. We know so much, we feel so little.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Making Pictures," Assorted Articles, M. Secker (1930).
  • 35.
    If a novel reveals true and vivid relationships, it is a moral work, no matter what the relationships consist in. If the novelist honours the relationship in itself, it will be a great novel.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Morality and the Novel," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 530, Viking Press (1936).

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  • 36.
    The search for happiness ... always ends in the ghastly sense of the bottomless nothingness into which you will inevitably fall if you strain any further.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by T. Seltzer (1928). "The Fox," The Tales of D. H. Lawrence, M. Secker (1934).

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  • 37.
    The proper study of mankind is man in his relation to his deity.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "The Proper Study," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 722, Viking Press (1936).
  • 38.
    So, she will never leap up that way again, with the yellow flash of
    a mountain lion's long shoot!
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British poet. Mountain Lion (l. 37). . . The Complete Poems [D. H. Lawrence]. Vivian de Sola Pinto and Warren Roberts, eds. (1993) Penguin Books.

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  • 39.
    If a woman hasn't got a tiny streak of a harlot in her, she's a dry stick as a rule.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, pt. 3, ed. E. McDonald (1936). Pornography and Obscenity (1930).

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  • 40.
    I believe that the highest virtue is to be happy, living in the greatest truth, not submitting to the falsehood of these personal times.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. The Letters of D. H. Lawrence, p. 317, letter, Feb. 7, 1916, to Lady Ottoline Morrell, Heinemann (1932).

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