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Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

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  • 1.
    A book lives as long as it is unfathomed.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Viking in 1932. Apocalypse, ch. 1, Viking Compass (1966).
  • 2.
    I have a very great fear of love. It is so personal. Let each bird fly with its own wings, and each fish swim its own course.—Morning brings more than love. And I want to be true to the morning.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Knopf (1926). The Plumed Serpent, ch. 25, Vintage Books (1951). Teresa (wife of Don Ramon) is speaking.

    Read more quotations about / on: fish, fly, love, fear
  • 3.
    Brave people add up to an aristocracy. The democracy of thou-shalt-not is bound to be a collection of weak men.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Viking in 1932. Apocalypse, ch. 4, Viking Compass (1966).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • 4.
    One never can know the whys and the wherefores of one's passional changes.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by T. Seltzer (1928). "The Captain's Doll," The Tales of D. H. Lawrence, M. Secker (1934).
  • 5.
    There is no such thing as liberty. You only change one sort of domination for another. All we can do is to choose our master.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Knopf (1926). The Plumed Serpent, ch. 4, Vintage Books (1951). Don Ramon is speaking.

    Read more quotations about / on: change
  • 6.
    He was naturally so sensitive, and so kind. But he had the insidious modern disease of tolerance. He must tolerate everything, even a thing that revolted him.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Knopf (1926). The Plumed Serpent, ch. 2, Vintage Books (1951). "He" is Owen Rhys, an American in Mexico.
  • 7.
    That which we are is absolute. There is no adding to it, no superseding this accomplished self. It is final and universal. All that remains is thoroughly to explore it.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "The Crown," Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine, Centaur Press (Philadelphia, 1925).
  • 8.
    Every profound new movement makes a great swing also backwards to some older, half-forgotten way of consciousness.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Viking in 1932. Apocalypse, ch. 6, Viking Compass (1966).
  • 9.
    Consciousness is an end in itself. We torture ourselves getting somewhere, and when we get there it is nowhere, for there is nowhere to get to.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Viking in 1932. Apocalypse, ch. 8, Viking Compass (1966).
  • 10.
    Having achieved and accomplished love ... man ... has become himself, his tale is told.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Study of Thomas Hardy," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 410, Viking Press (1936).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
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