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Quotations From CYRIL CONNOLLY


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  • Classical and romantic: private language of a family quarrel, a dead dispute over the distribution of emphasis between man and nature.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 3 (1944, rev. 1951).

    Read more quotations about / on: romantic, family, nature
  • The Expulsion from Eden is an act of vindictive womanish spite; the Fall of Man, as recounted in the Bible, comes nearer to the Fall of God.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 1 (1944, revised 1951).

    Read more quotations about / on: god
  • As bees their sting, so the promiscuous leave behind them in each encounter something of themselves by which they are made to suffer.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 2 (1944, revised 1951).

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  • A lazy person, whatever the talents with which he set out, will have condemned himself to second-hand thoughts and to second-rate friends.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 2 (1944, revised 1951).
  • When we have ceased to love the stench of the human animal, either in others or in ourselves, then are we condemned to misery, and clear thinking can begin.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 3 (1944, rev. 1951).

    Read more quotations about / on: animal, love
  • Civilization is maintained by a very few people in a small number of places and we need only some bombs and a few prisons to blot it out altogether.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 2 (1944, rev. edition 1951).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • The true index of a man's character is the health of his wife.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 2 (1944, rev. 1951).
  • Imprisoned in every fat man a thin one is wildly signalling to be let out.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 2 (1944, rev. 1951). There is a similar observation in George Orwell's Coming Up For Air, pt. 1, ch. 3 (1939): "I'm fat, but I'm thin inside. Has it ever struck you that there's a thin man inside every fat man, just as they say there's a statue inside every block of stone?" For a later variant, see Amis on obesity.
  • No taste is so acquired as that for someone else's quality of mind.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. "The Journal of Cyril Connolly 1928-1937," p. 230, David Pryce-Jones, Journal and Memoir (1983).
  • The English language is like a broad river on whose bank a few patient anglers are sitting, while, higher up, the stream is being polluted by a string of refuse-barges tipping out their muck.
    Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 3, Harper (1944).

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