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Quotations From CHARLES BAUDELAIRE

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  • 31.
    We are weighed down, every moment, by the conception and the sensation of Time. And there are but two means of escaping and forgetting this nightmare: pleasure and work. Pleasure consumes us. Work strengthens us. Let us choose.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. My Heart Laid Bare (written c. 1865), published in Intimate Journals, sct. 111 (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), rev. by Don Bachardy (1989).

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  • 32.
    On the day when a young writer corrects his first proof-sheet he is as proud as a schoolboy who has just got his first dose of pox.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. My Heart Laid Bare (written c. 1865), publ. in Intimate Journals, sct. 71 (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), rev. by Don Bachardy (1989).
  • 33.
    As a small child, I felt in my heart two contradictory feelings, the horror of life and the ecstasy of life.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, LV (1887).

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  • 34.
    Nearly all our originality comes from the stamp that time impresses upon our sensibility.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sct. 4, L'Art Romantique (1869).

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  • 35.
    For the merchant, even honesty is a financial speculation.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. "My Heart Laid Bare," sct. 97, Intimate Journals (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), rev. by Don Bachardy (1989).

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  • 36.
    Romanticism is found precisely neither in the choice of subjects nor in exact truth, but in a way of feeling.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Salon of 1846, II. What is Romanticism? (1846).

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  • 37.
    The dandy should aspire to be uninterruptedly sublime. He should live and sleep in front of a mirror.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. My Heart Laid Bare, Intimate Journals, sct. 27 (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), rev. Don Bachardy (1989).

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  • 38.
    It is unfortunately very true that, without leisure and money, love can be no more than an orgy of the common man.... Instead of being a sudden impulse full of ardour and reverie, it becomes a distastefully utilitarian affair.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sect. 9, published in L'Art Romantique (1869).

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  • 39.
    Everything that is beautiful and noble is the product of reason and calculation.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. Selected Writings, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). The Painter of Modern Life, sct. 11, published in L'Art Romantique (1869).

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  • 40.
    They were making their way with the resigned expression of those who are condemned to hope forever.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "To Each His Chimera," (1862).

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