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Quotations From CHARLES BAUDELAIRE

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  • 101.
    It is one of the prodigious privileges of art that the horrific, artistically expressed, becomes beauty, and that sorrow, given rhythm and cadence, fills the spirit with a calm joy.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. "Théophile Gautier," part IV (1859).

    Read more quotations about / on: sorrow, joy, beauty
  • 102.
    There is no dream of love, however ideal it may be, which does not end up with a fat, greedy baby hanging from the breast.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Samuel Cramer, in La Fanfarlo (1847), trans. 1986.

    Read more quotations about / on: baby, dream, love
  • 103.
    The artist is today and has been for many years, despite his absence of merit, simply a spoiled child. So many honors, so much money bestowed on men without souls and without education.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Salon of 1859, I. The Modern Artist (1859).

    Read more quotations about / on: education, today, money, child
  • 104.
    The immense profundity of thought in vulgar locutions, like holes dug by generations of ants.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, I (1887).
  • 105.
    Are you not the oasis where I dream, and the gourd from which I drink in long draughts the wine of memory?
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "Her Hair," (1859).

    Read more quotations about / on: memory, dream
  • 106.
    For me, Romanticism is the most recent and the most current expression of beauty.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Salon of 1846, II. What is Romanticism? (1846).

    Read more quotations about / on: beauty
  • 107.
    Everything for me becomes allegory.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "The Swan," (1860).
  • 108.
    I have to confess that I had gambled on my soul and lost it with heroic insouciance and lightness of touch. The soul is so impalpable, so often useless, and sometimes such a nuisance, that I felt no more emotion on losing it than if, on a stroll, I had mislaid my visiting card.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 4, "Shorter Prose Poems," ed. Yves-Gérard le Dantec; rev. Claude Pichois (1953). "The Generous Gambler," in Figaro (Paris, Feb. 7, 1864).

    Read more quotations about / on: lost, sometimes
  • 109.
    There is no more steely barb than that of the Infinite.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. Complete Works, vol. 1, "Shorter Prose Poems," ed. Gérard le Dantec; rev. Claude Pichois (1953). The Artist "Confiteor," La Presse (Paris, Aug. 26, 1862).
  • 110.
    Whether you come from heaven or hell, what does it matter, O Beauty!
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French. Flowers of Evil, "Hymn to Beauty," (1860).

    Read more quotations about / on: heaven, beauty
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