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Quotations From BLAISE PASCAL

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  • 41.
    A trifle consoles us, for a trifle distresses us.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 136 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • 42.
    Le silence éternel de ces espaces infinis m'effraie. The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, mathematician. Pensées, iii. 206, ed. L. Brunschvieg, 5th edition (1909).

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  • 43.
    Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connait point. The heart has its reasons which reason does not know of.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, mathematician. Pensées, iv. 277, ed. L. Brunschvieg, 5th edition (1909).

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  • 44.
    Through space the universe encompasses and swallows me up like an atom; through thought I comprehend the world.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 348 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • 45.
    The heart has its reasons which reason does not know.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French mathematician, scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 423, p. 259, Selections, ed. R.H. Popkin, Macmillan, New York (1989). The Pensées are diverse writings and notes that Pascal left at the time of his death. They are the classic presentation of his ideas.

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  • 46.
    The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing: we know this in countless ways.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 423, ed. Karailshemer, no. 277, ed. Brunschvicg (1670).

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  • 47.
    It is not through space that I must seek my dignity, but through the management of my thought. I shall have no more if I possess worlds.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 348 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • 48.
    It is not in Montaigne, but in myself, that I find all that I see in him.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 64 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931). Referring to Michel de Montaigne, the sixteenth-century writer of essays who influenced Pascal powerfully.
  • 49.
    The only shame is to have none.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 194 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • 50.
    The last thing one discovers in composing a work is what to put first.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 976, ed. Krailsheimer; no. 19, ed. Brunschvicg (1670, trans. 1688), rev. A.J. Krailsheimer (1966).

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