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Quotations From BLAISE PASCAL


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  • As men are not able to fight against death, misery, ignorance, they have taken it into their heads, in order to be happy, not to think of them at all.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 168 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • Men often take their imagination for their heart; and they believe they are converted as soon as they think of being converted.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 275 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • The great mass of people judge well of things, for they are in natural ignorance, which is man's true state.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 327 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • We run heedlessly into the abyss after putting something in front of us to stop us seeing it.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 166, eds. Krailsheimer and Brunschvicg (1670).
  • Between us and heaven or hell there is only life, which is the frailest thing in the world.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 213 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • We run carelessly to the precipice, after we have put something before us to prevent us seeing it.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 183 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • The eternal silence of these infinite spaces fills me with dread.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, nos. 201, 206, no. 201, ed. Krailsheimer; no. 206, ed. Brunschvicg (1670).

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  • Animals do not admire each other. A horse does not admire its companion.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 685, ed. Krailsheimer, no. 401, ed. Brunschvicg (1670).

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  • Eloquence is a painting of thought; and thus those who, after having painted it, add something more, make a picture instead of a portrait.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 26 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • Words differently arranged have a different meaning, and meanings differently arranged have different effects.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 23 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
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