Quotations From BLAISE PASCAL

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  • 1.
    Atheism shows strength of mind, but only to a certain degree.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 225 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • 2.
    Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French mathematician, scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 412, p. 148, trans. by and ed. A.J. Krailsheimer, Penguin, Baltimore (1966). Pensées are diverse writings and notes that Pascal left at the time of his death. They are the classic presentation of his ideas.
  • 3.
    Continuous eloquence wearies.... Grandeur must be abandoned to be appreciated. Continuity in everything is unpleasant. Cold is agreeable, that we may get warm.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 355 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • 4.
    The strength of a man's virtue must not be measured by his efforts, but by his ordinary life.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 352 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • 5.
    Had Cleopatra's nose been shorter, the whole face of the world would have changed.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 413, ed. Krailsheimer; no. 162, ed. Brunschvicg (1670, trans. 1688), rev. A.J. Krailsheimer (1966).

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  • 6.
    I maintain that, if everyone knew what others said about him, there would not be four friends in the world.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 792, ed. Krailsheimer; no. 101, ed. Brunschvicg (1670).

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  • 7.
    The self is hateful.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 597, ed. Krailsheimer; no. 455, ed. Brunschvicg (1670, trans. 1688), rev. A.J. Krailsheimer (1966).
  • 8.
    The sensitivity of men to small matters, and their indifference to great ones, indicates a strange inversion.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 198 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • 9.
    The charm of fame is so great that we like every object to which it is attached, even death.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 158 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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  • 10.
    The weather and my mood have little connection. I have my foggy and my fine days within me; my prosperity or misfortune has little to do with the matter.
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 107 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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