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Quotations From ANTHONY TROLLOPE

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  • 21.
    A fellow oughtn't to let his family property go to pieces.
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Dolly Longestaffe, in The Way We Live Now, vol. 2, ch. xxviii, London, Chapman and Hall (1875).

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  • 22.
    What is there that money will not do?
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Lady Carbury, in The Way We Live Now, vol. 2, ch. xx, London, Chapman and Hall (1875).

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  • 23.
    Neither money nor position can atone to me for low birth.
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Lady Amelia de Courcy, Doctor Thorne, vol. 3, ch. xxxviii, London, Chapman and Hall (1858).

    Read more quotations about / on: birth, money
  • 24.
    I think I owe my life to cork soles.
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Lady Rosina de Courcy, in The Prime Minister, vol. 4, ch. xxvii, London, Chapman and Hall (1876).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 25.
    Let there be no steps backward. A thought as to the manliness of persevering, of the want of manliness in yielding to depression, came to his rescue.
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Harry Heathcote of Gangoil, vol. 1, ch. v, London, Sampson, Low (1874).

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  • 26.
    Short accounts make long friends.
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Mrs. Tappitt, in Rachel Ray, vol. 2, ch. xxx, London, Chapman and Hall (1863).
  • 27.
    Since woman's rights have come up a young woman is better able to fight her own battle.
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Miss Thoroughbung, in Mr. Scarborough's Family, vol. 3, ch. xxvi, London, Chatto and Windus (1883).

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  • 28.
    There are some achievements which are never done in the presence of those who hear of them. Catching salmon is one, and working all night is another.
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Marion Fay, vol. 3, ch. xliv, London, Chapman and Hall (1882).

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  • 29.
    When a man is ill nothing is so important to him as his own illness.
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Marion Fay, vol. 3, ch. li, London, Chapman and Hall (1882).
  • 30.
    They're a queer lot;Main't they,—the sort of people one meets about in the world?
    Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Lord Carruthers, in The Eustace Diamonds, vol. 3, ch. lxxv, London, Chapman and Hall (1873).

    Read more quotations about / on: people, world
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