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Quotations From ALDOUS HUXLEY

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  • 61.
    Sons have always a rebellious wish to be disillusioned by that which charmed their fathers.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. repr. In Music at Night and Other Essays (1949). "Vulgarity in Literature," (1930).
  • 62.
    Consistency is contrary to nature, contrary to life. The only completely consistent people are the dead.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Wordsworth in the Tropics," Do What You Will (1929).

    Read more quotations about / on: nature, people, life
  • 63.
    Isn't it remarkable how everyone who knew Lawrence has felt compelled to write about him? Why, he's had more books written about him than any writer since Byron!
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Interview in Writers at Work, Second Series, ed. George Plimpton (1963).
  • 64.
    After all, what is reading but a vice, like drink or venery or any other form of excessive self-indulgence? One reads to tickle and amuse one's mind; one reads, above all, to prevent oneself thinking.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Mr. Scogan, in Crome Yellow, ch. 14 (1922).
  • 65.
    Amour is the one human activity of any importance in which laughter and pleasure preponderate, if ever so slightly, over misery and pain.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Mr. Scogan, in Crome Yellow, ch. 15 (1922).

    Read more quotations about / on: laughter, pain
  • 66.
    Most of one's life is one prolonged effort to prevent oneself thinking.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Mr. Topes, in "Green Tunnels," Mortal Coils (1922).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 67.
    Henri IV's feet and armpits enjoyed an international reputation.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. The Devils of Loudun, ch. 10 (1952). Huxley was referring to the stories that circulated concerning the "physiological accidents" of the French royal court. "It was precisely because great men tried to seem more than human," he wrote, "that the rest of the world welcomed any reminder that, in part at least, they were still merely animal."
  • 68.
    Ignore death up to the last moment; then, when it can't be ignored any longer, have yourself squirted full of morphia and shuffle off in a coma. Thoroughly sensible, humane and scientific, eh?
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Bruno Rontini, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 26 (1944). But in his 1936 novel Eyeless in Gaza, ch. 31, Huxley wrote, "Death ... the only thing we haven't succeeded in completely vulgarizing."

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  • 69.
    There's only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that's your own self.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Carlo Malpighi quoting Bruno Rontini, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 7 (1944).
  • 70.
    The philosophy of action for action, power for the sake of power, had become an established orthodoxy. "Thou has conquered, O go-getting Babbitt."
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 12 (1944). In this passage the narrator reports Eustace Barnack's thoughts and concludes with his reworking of Algernon Charles Swinburne's poem "An Interlude," "Thou hast conquered, O pale Galilean" substituting Sinclair Lewis's character who represents the ideology of small- town capitalism.

    Read more quotations about / on: power
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