Quotations From ALDOUS HUXLEY


» More about Aldous Huxley on Poemhunter

 

  • All urbanization, pushed beyond a certain point, automatically becomes suburbanization.... Every great city is just a collection of suburbs. Its inhabitants ... do not live in their city; they merely inhabit it.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Oaxaca," Beyond the Mexique Bay (1934).

    Read more quotations about / on: city
  • Single-mindedness is all very well in cows or baboons; in an animal claiming to belong to the same species as Shakespeare it is simply disgraceful.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Pascal," sct. 24, Do What You Will (1929).

    Read more quotations about / on: animal
  • Morality is always the product of terror; its chains and strait-waistcoats are fashioned by those who dare not trust others, because they dare not trust themselves, to walk in liberty.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Pascal," sct. 23, "Summary of the Life-Worshipper's Creed," Do What You Will (1929).

    Read more quotations about / on: trust
  • A man may be a pessimistic determinist before lunch and an optimistic believer in the will's freedom after it.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Pascal," sct. 23, Do What You Will (1929).

    Read more quotations about / on: freedom
  • A bad book is as much of a labour to write as a good one; it comes as sincerely from the author's soul.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Point Counter Point, ch. 13 (1928).
  • Everyone who wants to do good to the human race always ends in universal bullying.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 8 (1944). Eustace Barnack's sarcasm at the expense of an American ideologue reflects Huxley's distrust of political activism.
  • The business of a seer is to see; and if he involves himself in the kind of God-eclipsing activities which make seeing impossible, he betrays the trust which his fellows have tacitly placed in him.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Grey Eminence, ch. 10 (1941).

    Read more quotations about / on: trust, god
  • Thought must be divided against itself before it can come to any knowledge of itself.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Wordsworth in the Tropics," Do What You Will (1929).
  • I'm afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Miss Thriplow, in Those Barren Leaves, pt. 1, ch. 1 (1925).

    Read more quotations about / on: dark
  • Man approaches the unattainable truth through a succession of errors.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Wordsworth in the Tropics," Do What You Will (1929).

    Read more quotations about / on: truth
[Report Error]