Quotations From ALDOUS HUXLEY


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  • That all men are equal is a proposition to which, at ordinary times, no sane human being has ever given his assent.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "The Idea of Equality," Proper Studies (1927).
  • The condition of being forgiven is self-abandonment. The proud man prefers self-reproach, however painful—because the reproached self isn't abandoned; it remains intact.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Bruno Rontini's notes, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 30 (1944).
  • It takes two to make a murder. There are born victims, born to have their throats cut, as the cut-throats are born to be hanged.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Maurice Spandrell, in Point Counter Point, ch. 12 (1928).

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  • Oh, how desperately bored, in spite of their grim determination to have a Good Time, the majority of pleasure-seekers really are!
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Holy Face," Do What You Will (1929).

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  • Man approaches the unattainable truth through a succession of errors.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Wordsworth in the Tropics," Do What You Will (1929).

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  • I'm afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Miss Thriplow, in Those Barren Leaves, pt. 1, ch. 1 (1925).

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  • Thought must be divided against itself before it can come to any knowledge of itself.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Wordsworth in the Tropics," Do What You Will (1929).
  • The business of a seer is to see; and if he involves himself in the kind of God-eclipsing activities which make seeing impossible, he betrays the trust which his fellows have tacitly placed in him.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Grey Eminence, ch. 10 (1941).

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  • Everyone who wants to do good to the human race always ends in universal bullying.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 8 (1944). Eustace Barnack's sarcasm at the expense of an American ideologue reflects Huxley's distrust of political activism.
  • The poet's place, it seems to me, is with the Mr. Hydes of human nature.
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Wordsworth in the Tropics," Do What You Will (1929). See also Huxley's comment under "artists."

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