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Quotations From 4TH EARL CHESTERFIELD, PHILIP DORMER STANHOPE

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  • 101.
    In the mass of mankind, I fear, there is too great a majority of fools and knaves; who, singly from their number, must to a certain degree be respected, though they are by no means respectable.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Dec. 20, 1748, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. II, p. 120, London (1774).

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  • 102.
    You should be alerte, adroit, vif; be wanted, talked of, impatiently expected, and unwillingly parted with in company.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Nov. 14, 1749, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. II, pp. 255-56, London (1774). Alerte, adroit, vif: quick-minded, clever, lively.
  • 103.
    It is to be presumed, that a man of common sense, who does not desire to please, desires nothing at all; since he must know that he cannot obtain anything without it.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Jan. 15, 1753, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 304, London (1774). One of the Maxims enclosed by Chesterfield in his letter of this date.
  • 104.
    A proper secrecy is the only mystery of able men; mystery is the only secrecy of weak and cunning ones.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Jan. 15, 1753, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 298, London (1774). One of the Maxims enclosed with Chesterfield's letter of this date.
  • 105.
    Let blockheads read what blockheads wrote.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Nov. 1, 1750, repr. in The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 2, no. 232, ed. Charles Strachey (1901). (First published 1774).
  • 106.
    Most people have ears, but few have judgment; tickle those ears, and depend upon it you will catch their judgments, such as they are.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Dec. 9, 1749; repr. in The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 1, no. 206, ed. Charles Strachey (1901). (First published 1774).

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  • 107.
    There is time enough for everything, in the course of the day, if you do but one thing at once; but there is not time enough in the year, if you will do two things at a time.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Apr. 1747, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. I, p. 264, London (1774). Written when Chesterfield's illegitimate son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl (?1732-69), was about fifteen.

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  • 108.
    Love has been not unaptly compared to the small-pox, which most people have sooner or later.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, June 23, 1752, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. III, p. 321, London (1774).

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  • 109.
    A young man, be his merit what it will, can never raise himself; but must, like the ivy round the oak, twine himself round some man of great power and interest.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Jan. 15, 1753, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 300, London (1774). One of the Maxims enclosed with Chesterfield's letter of this date.

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  • 110.
    By-gones are by-gones, as Chartres, when he was dying, said of his sins: let us look forwards.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Sept. 26, 1758, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 156, London (1774). Col. Francis Chartres (1675-1732), a notorious profligate, who was featured in William Hogarth's Harlot's Progress.

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