Quotations About / On: DEPRESSION

  • 11.
    There are times when the pain becomes a torture for a man. But the phoenix is always supposed to rise from the ashes. So let us not be bogged down by depression but we must confront the adversities slowly but firmly.
    (How to face the adversities?)
    More quotations from: Rajnish Manga
  • 12.
    During depression the world disappears. Language itself. One has nothing to say. Nothing. No small talk, no anecdotes. Nothing can be risked on the board of talk. Because the inner voice is so urgent in its own discourse: How shall I live? How shall I manage the future? Why should I go on?
    (Kate Millett (b. 1934), U.S. feminist theorist, literary critic, essayist, autobiographer, sculptor. The Loony-Bin Trip, pt. 3, Simon and Schuster (1990).)
  • 13.
    Let there be no steps backward. A thought as to the manliness of persevering, of the want of manliness in yielding to depression, came to his rescue.
    (Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Harry Heathcote of Gangoil, vol. 1, ch. v, London, Sampson, Low (1874).)
    More quotations from: Anthony Trollope, depression
  • 14.
    In the larger view the major forces of the depression now lie outside of the United States, and our recuperation has been retarded by the unwarranted degree of fear and apprehension created by these outside forces.
    (Herbert Hoover (1874-1964), U.S. president. Ed. Arnold S. Rice, Herbert Hoover, 1874-1964: ChronologyDocumentsBibliographical Aids, p. 61, Dobbs Ferry (1971).)
    More quotations from: Herbert Hoover, depression, fear
  • 15.
    In addition to my other numerous acquaintances, I have one more intimate confidant.... My depression is the most faithful mistress I have known—no wonder, then, that I return the love.
    (Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "Diapsalmata," vol. 1, Either/Or (1843, trans. 1987).)
    More quotations from: Soren Kierkegaard, depression, love
  • 16.
    Geez, if I could get through to you, kiddo, that depression is not sobbing and crying and giving vent, it is plain and simple reduction of feeling. Reduction, see? Of all feeling. People who keep stiff upper lips find that it's damn hard to smile.
    (Judith Guest (b. 1936), U.S. author. The psychiatrist Berger to Conrad Jarrett, in Ordinary People, ch. 27 (1976).)
  • 17.
    The term clinical depression finds its way into too many conversations these days. One has a sense that a catastrophe has occurred in the psychic landscape.
    (Leonard Cohen (b. 1934), Canadian singer, poet, novelist. International Herald Tribune (Paris, Nov. 4, 1988).)
    More quotations from: Leonard Cohen, depression
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