Quotations About / On: DAUGHTER

  • 41.
    Doesn't that show what an old man I am, when I can say to a mother "I love your daughter," and not get the reply "what are your intentions, and what is your income?"
    (Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832-1898), British author, mathematician, clergyman. letter, Feb. 12, 1887, to Mrs. H.A. Feilden. The Letters of Lewis Carroll, vol. II, ed. Morton N. Cohen, Oxford University Press (1979).)
  • 42.
    It's a dangerous thing to be married right up to the hilt, like my daughter's husband. The man is at home all day, like a damned soul in hell.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (1919). Captain Shotover, in Heartbreak House, act 2, The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 5, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1972).)
  • 43.
    One must leave one's parents early, especially one's mother. Mothers are never any good for their daughters. They forget they were just as ugly and silly and scraggy when they were little girls.
    (Robert, Mrs. Henrey (b. 1906), French author. Paloma, in Paloma, ch. 3 (1951).)
    More quotations from: Mrs Henrey, Robert, leave, mother
  • 44.
    It's important for all single parents to remember that not everything that goes wrong, from your son's bad attitude toward school to the six holes in your teenage daughter's ear, is because you live in a single-parent home. Every family has its problems.
    (Marge Kennedy (20th century), U.S. writer, and Janet Spencer King (20th century), U.S. writer. The Single Parent Family, ch. 6 (1994).)
  • 45.
    Because mothers and daughters can affirm and enjoy their commonalities more readily, they are more likely to see how they might advance their individual interests in tandem, without one having to be sacrificed for the other.
    (Mary Field Belenky (20th century), psychologist, Blythe Mcvicker Clinchy (20th century), psychologist, and Nancy Rule Goldberger (20th century), psychologist. Women's Ways of Knowing, part 2, ch. 8 (1986).)
    More quotations from: Mary Field Belenky
  • 46.
    [T]he syndrome known as life is too diffuse to admit of palliation. For every symptom that is eased, another is made worse. The horse leech's daughter is a closed system. Her quantum of wantum cannot vary.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1938. Wylie, in Murphy, p. 57, Grove Press (1959). "Horse leech's daughter" is an allusion to Proverbs 30:15.)
  • 47.
    The general Mistake among us in the Educating of our Children, is, That in our Daughters we take Care of their Persons and neglect their Minds; in our Sons, we are so intent upon adorning their Minds, that we wholly neglect their Bodies.
    (Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 66 (1711).)
    More quotations from: Richard Steele, children
  • 48.
    To begin to use cultural forces for the good of our daughters we must first shake ourselves awake from the cultural trance we all live in. This is no small matter, to untangle our true beliefs from what we have been taught to believe about who and what girls and women are.
    (Jeanne Elium (20th century), U.S. writer and educator, and Elium (20th century), U.S. family counselor and author. Raising a Daughter, ch. 4 (1994).)
    More quotations from: Jeanne Elium, believe, women
  • 49.
    Mommy is still the front-line parent, and Daddy is still the "other." Daddy is still "different." Daddy is still a daughter's defender, her hero, the first man in her life—no matter how old she is.
    (Victoria Secunda (20th century), U.S. psychologist and author. Women and Their Fathers, ch. 1 (1992).)
  • 50.
    Had I represented twenty thousand voters in Michigan, that political editor would not have known nor cared whether I was the oldest or the youngest daughter of Methuselah, or whether my bonnet came from the Ark or from Worth's.
    (Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in Eighty Years and More, ch. 18, by Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1898). Anthony said this c. 1873, reacting to an editorial in a Kalamazoo, Michigan, journal which focused on her appearance, ridiculing her age (53) and her style of dress. Methuselah was the oldest man mentioned in the Bible; he died at age 969. Worth's was a store that sold fine clothing.)
    More quotations from: Susan B Anthony, daughter
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