Learn More

Quotations About / On: DANCE

  • 41.
    Over there, in Europe, all was shame and anger. Here it was exile or solitude, among these languid and agitated madmen who danced in order to die.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian novelist, dramatist, philosopher. D'Arrast in Brazil, in Exile and the Kingdom, "The Growing Stone," p. 174, Gallimard (1957).)
    More quotations from: Albert Camus, anger, solitude
  • 42.
    At male strip shows, it is still the women that we watch, the audience of women and their eager faces. They are more obscene than if they were dancing naked themselves.
    (Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929), French semiologist. Cool Memories, ch. 2 (1987, trans. 1990).)
    More quotations from: Jean Baudrillard, women
  • 43.
    I say to you: we must still have chaos within us to be able to give birth to a dancing star. I say to you: you still have chaos within you.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 19, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, First Part, "Prologue," section 5 (1883).)
  • 44.
    I can get dressed earlier in the evening with every intention of going to a dance at midnight, but somehow after the theatre the thing to do seems to be either to go to bed or sit around somewhere. It doesn't seem possible that somewhere people can be expecting you at an hour like that.
    (Robert Benchley (1889-1945), U.S. writer, humorist. The Treasurer's Report and Other Aspects of Community Singing, "One Minute Please," Grosset & Dunlap (1930).)
    More quotations from: Robert Benchley, dance, people
  • 45.
    The harp is an insipid instrument—no good for dancing, feasting, or marching, only for sitting primly in a parlor or on a cloud.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley
  • 46.
    Dancing begets warmth, which is the parent of wantonness. It is, Sir, the great grandfather of cuckoldom.
    (Henry Fielding (1707-1754), British novelist, dramatist. Sir Positive Trap, in Love in Several Masques, act 3, sc. 7.)
    More quotations from: Henry Fielding
  • 47.
    I could dance yet—only had a good fiddle—I like music. A good fiddle always starts the Negro, even if he's old.
    (Sylvia Dubois (1788?-1889), African American slave and hog breeder. :As quoted in Silvia Dubois, a Biografy of the Slav Who Whipt Her Mistres and Gand Her Fredom, interview dated December 20, 1883, by C. W. Larison (1883).)
    More quotations from: Sylvia Dubois, dance, music
  • 48.
    I avoid talking before the youth of the age as I would dancing before them: for if one's tongue don't move in the steps of the day, and thinks to please by its old graces, it is only an object of ridicule.
    (Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Letter, April 15, 1768.)
    More quotations from: Horace Walpole
  • 49.
    If I'm on skates, I feel at home no matter what I'm doing. If they wanted me to sing and dance I think I could do it just because I was on skates. When I'm not on skates, though, I feel very strange.
    (Dorothy Hamill (b. 1956), U.S. ice skater. As quoted in WomenSports magazine, p. 48 (June 1977). In the preceding year, Hamill had won the Olympic gold medal for women's figure skating.)
    More quotations from: Dorothy Hamill, dance, home
  • 50.
    Books treating of etiquette ... are often written by dancing-masters and Turveydrops and others knowing little of the customs of the best society of any land.
    (Mrs. H. O. Ward (1824-1899), U.S. author. Sensible Etiquette of the Best Society Customs, Manners, Morals, and Home Culture, Compiled from the Best Authorities, ch. 7 (1878).)
    More quotations from: Mrs. H. O Ward
[Hata Bildir]