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Quotations About / On: DANCE

  • 21.
    The only dance masters I could have were Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Walt Whitman and Nietzsche.
    (Isadora Duncan (1878-1927), U.S. dancer. My Life, ch. 8 (1927).)
    More quotations from: Isadora Duncan, dance
  • 22.
    Dancers dance through their pain. I shrink from mine.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Eleventh Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, dance, pain
  • 23.
    Listen, sister. I don't dance and I can't take time out now to learn.
    (Frank W. Wead (1895?-1947), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Lt. Rusty Ryan (John Wayne), They Were Expendable, reply to nurse Lt. Sandy Davis (Donna Reed), who invites him to a dance (1945). Based on the book by William L. White.)
    More quotations from: Frank W Wead, sister, dance, time
  • 24.
    Now is the time for drinking [nunc est bibendum], now is the time to make the earth shake with dancing.
    (Horace [Quintus Horatius Flaccus] (65-8 B.C.), Roman poet. Odes, bk. 1, ode 37, l. 1 (23 B.C.), trans. by Kate Hughes (1995). Ode on the death of Cleopatra.)
  • 25.
    Dancing and running shake up the chemistry of happiness.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Third Selection, New York (1986).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, running, happiness
  • 26.
    Morality measured in centimeters: all mothers believe that only their daughters dance decently.
    (José Bergamín (1895-1983), Spanish writer. El cohete y la estrella (The Rocket and the Star), p. 41, Madrid, Biblioteca de Indice (1923).)
    More quotations from: José Bergamín, dance, believe
  • 27.
    The within, all that inner space one never sees, the brain and the heart and other caverns where thought and feeling dance their sabbath.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1953. Molloy, in Molloy, p. 11, Grove Press (1970).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Beckett, dance, heart
  • 28.
    It is no doubt possible to fly—but first you must know how to dance like an angel.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 552, selection 17[46], eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to Fall 1883.)
  • 29.
    At the extreme north, the voyagers are obliged to dance and act plays for employment.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 172, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Thoreau uses the term "employment" in the sense of "in order to have something to do.")
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, dance
  • 30.
    They teach the morals of a whore, and the manners of a dancing master.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, 1754 entry (1791). Referring to Lord Chesterfield's Letters to His Son. Of Chesterfield—Johnson's erratic patron—he remarked, "This man I thought had been a Lord among wits; but, I find, he is only a wit among Lords.")
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson
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