Quotations About / On: CHILDHOOD

  • 41.
    Childhood lasts all through life. It returns to animate broad sections of adult life.... Poets will help us to find this living childhood within us, this permanent, durable immobile world.
    (Gaston Bachelard (1884-1962), French scientist, philosopher, literary theorist. "Introduction," sct. 6, The Poetics of Reverie (1960, trans. 1969).)
  • 42.
    When we raise our children, we relive our childhood. Forgotten memories, painful and pleasurable, rise to the surface.... So each of us thinks, almost daily, of how our own childhood compares with our children's, and of what our children's future will hold.
    (Richard Louv (20th century), U.S. journalist, author. Childhood's Future, part 1, ch. 1 (1991).)
  • 43.
    All of childhood's unanswered questions must finally be passed back to the town and answered there. Heroes and bogey men, values and dislikes, are first encountered and labeled in that early environment. In later years they change faces, places and maybe races, tactics, intensities and goals, but beneath those penetrable masks they wear forever the stocking-capped faces of childhood.
    (Maya Angelou (b. 1928), U.S. author, poet. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, ch. 4 (1969). Said of one's hometown.)
  • 44.
    Genius is no more than childhood recaptured at will, childhood equipped now with man's physical means to express itself, and with the analytical mind that enables it to bring order into the sum of experience, involuntarily amassed.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sct. 3, L'Art Romantique (1869).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire, childhood
  • 45.
    I am continually amazed at how old young has become. Didn't we, like our grandchildren, begin with a childhood we thought would never end? Now, all of a sudden, I'm older than my parents were when I thought they were old.
    (Lois Wyse (20th century), U.S. author. Funny, You Don't Look Like a Grandmother, "Age-Old Conversations," (1990).)
    More quotations from: Lois Wyse, childhood
  • 46.
    Today the world changes so quickly that in growing up we take leave not just of youth but of the world we were young in.... Fear and resentment of what is new is really a lament for the memories of our childhood.
    (Peter B. Medawar (1915-1987), British immunologist. "On 'The Effecting of All Things Possible'," Pluto's Republic (1982).)
  • 47.
    When we suffer anguish we return to early childhood because that is the period in which we first learnt to suffer the experience of total loss. It was more than that. It was the period in which we suffered more total losses than in all the rest of our life put together.
    (John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. (repr. 1976). A Fortunate Man, p. 122 (1967).)
  • 48.
    It is with our brothers and sisters that we learn to love, share, negotiate, start and end fights, hurt others, and save face. The basis of healthy (or unhealthy) connections in adulthood is cast during childhood.
    (Jane Mersky Leder (20th century), U.S. magazine writer, author. Brothers and Sisters, ch. 3 (1991).)
  • 49.
    We have not passed that subtle line between childhood and adulthood until we move from the passive voice to the active voice—that is, until we have stopped saying "It got lost," and say, "I lost it."
    (Sydney J. Harris (b. 1917), U.S. journalist. On the Contrary, ch. 7 (1962).)
    More quotations from: Sydney J Harris, lost, childhood
  • 50.
    [T]ea, that uniquely English meal, that unnecessary collation at which no stimulants—neither alcohol nor meat—are served, that comforting repast of which to partake is as good as second childhood.
    (Angela Carter (1940-1992), British postmodern novelist. repr. Vintage (1992). Expletives Deleted, ntroduction to Walter de la Mare, Memoirs of a Midget, Oxford University Press (1982).)
    More quotations from: Angela Carter, childhood
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