Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: CHILDHOOD

  • 41.
    In all our efforts to provide "advantages" we have actually produced the busiest, most competitive, highly pressured and over-organized generation of youngsters in our history—and possibly the unhappiest. We seem hell-bent on eliminating much of childhood.
    (Eda Le Shan (b. 1922), U.S. educator, author. The Conspiracy Against Childhood, ch. 1 (1967).)
    More quotations from: Eda Le Shan, childhood, history
  • 42.
    But no matter how they make you feel, you should always watch elders carefully. They were you and you will be them. You carry the seeds of your old age in you at this very moment, and they hear the echoes of their childhood each time they see you.
    (Kent Nerburn (20th century), U.S. theologian and author. Letters to My Son, ch. 26 (1994).)
    More quotations from: Kent Nerburn, childhood, time
  • 43.
    A society in which adults are estranged from the world of children, and often from their own childhood, tends to hear children's speech only as a foreign language, or as a lie.... Children have been treated ... as congenital fibbers, fakers and fantasisers.
    (Beatrix Campbell (b. 1947), British journalist. Unofficial Secrets, ch. 2 (1988).)
  • 44.
    ...the hard work and poverty of my childhood ... turned out to be my greatest asset in later years. Nothing could ever seem too hard after that.
    (Sue Sanders, U.S. oil producer. Our Common Herd, ch. 30 (1940). Through the death of her father when she was five and marriage to a luckless farmer when she was fourteen, Sanders had experienced great financial and emotional stress. Separating from her husband at age eighteen, with their two babies in tow, she went on to become a successful businesswoman.)
  • 45.
    Someone said: "I have been prejudiced against myself from my earliest childhood: hence I find some truth in all blame and some stupidity in all praise. I generally estimate praise too poorly and blame too highly."
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 665, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 262, "Prejudiced," (1880).)
  • 46.
    Adulthood is the ever-shrinking period between childhood and old age. It is the apparent aim of modern industrial societies to reduce this period to a minimum.
    (Thomas Szasz (b. 1920), U.S. psychiatrist. "Social Relations," The Second Sin (1973).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Szasz, childhood
  • 47.
    To be a social success, do not act pathetic, arrogant, or bored. Do not discuss your unhappy childhood, your visit to the dentist, the shortcomings of your cleaning woman, the state of your bowels, or your spouse's bad habits. You will be thought a paragon (or perhaps a monster) of good behavior.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection, New York (1992).)
  • 48.
    Parenthood brings profound pleasure and satisfactions—the unparalleled pleasure of caring so intensely for another human being, of watching growth, of reliving childhood, of seeing oneself in a new perspective, and of understanding more about life.
    (Ellen Galinsky (20th century), U.S. author and researcher. Between Generations, ch. 2 (1981).)
    More quotations from: Ellen Galinsky, childhood, life
  • 49.
    ... no one with a happy childhood ever amounts to much in this world. They are so well adjusted, they never are driven to achieve anything.
    (Sue Grafton (b. 1940), U.S. murder mystery novelist. As quoted in the New York Times, p. C10 (August 4, 1994). Grafton, author of a popular series of detective novels, was the daughter of two alcoholics and described their parenting as "benign neglect.")
    More quotations from: Sue Grafton, childhood, happy, world
  • 50.
    Psychiatric enlightenment has begun to debunk the superstition that to manage a machine you must become a machine, and that to raise masters of the machine you must mechanize the impulses of childhood.
    (Erik H. Erikson (1904-1994), U.S. psychoanalyst. Childhood and Society, ch. 8 (1950).)
    More quotations from: Erik H Erikson, childhood
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