Quotations About / On: CHILDHOOD

  • 31.
    One of the luckiest things that can happen to you in life is, I think, to have a happy childhood.
    (Agatha Christie (1890-1976), British mystery writer. As quoted in Wit and Wisdom for the Peanut Butter Gang, by H. Jackson Brown (1994).)
  • 32.
    Dear, sweet, unforgettable childhood! Why does this irrevocable time, forever departed, seem brighter, more festive and richer than it actually was?
    (Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. The bishop's thoughts in The Bishop, Works, vol. 10, p. 188, "Nauka" (1976).)
  • 33.
    I am convinced that, except in a few extraordinary cases, one form or another of an unhappy childhood is essential to the formation of exceptional gifts.
    (Thornton Wilder (1897-1975), U.S. novelist, dramatist. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).)
    More quotations from: Thornton Wilder, childhood
  • 34.
    Some men have a necessity to be mean, as if they were exercising a faculty which they had to partially neglect since early childhood.
    (F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Notebook O," The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).)
    More quotations from: F. Scott Fitzgerald, childhood
  • 35.
    In the man whose childhood has known caresses and kindness, there is always a fibre of memory that can be touched by gentle issues.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (20th century), British novelist. Ed. By Carolyn Warner. The Last Word, ch. 26 (1992).)
  • 36.
    We seem but to linger in manhood to tell the dreams of our childhood, and they vanish out of memory ere we learn the language.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Journals, entry for February 19, 1841 (1906).)
  • 37.
    We linger in manhood to tell the dreams of our childhood, and they are half forgotten ere we have learned the language.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 406, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, childhood
  • 38.
    But childhood prolonged, cannot remain a fairyland. It becomes a hell.
    (Louise Bogan (1897-1970), U.S. poet and critic. repr. In Selected Criticism: Poetry and Prose (1955). "Childhood's False Eden," (1940). Referring to Katherine Mansfield.)
    More quotations from: Louise Bogan, childhood
  • 39.
    Let a man turn to his own childhood—no further—if he will renew his sense of remoteness, and of the mystery of change.
    (Alice Meynell (1847-1922), British poet, essayist. "The Illusion of Historic Time," Essays (1914).)
    More quotations from: Alice Meynell, childhood, change
  • 40.
    All those writers who write about their childhood! Gentle God, if I wrote about mine you wouldn't sit in the same room with me.
    (Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).)
    More quotations from: Dorothy Parker, childhood, god
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