Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: BEACH

  • 11.
    ... while I may paint in the tints or outlines of rocks and beaches, dawns and harbor, fleet and wharf, I never draw portraits of my neighbors or of my friends.
    (Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844-1911), U.S. novelist and short story writer. Chapters from a Life, ch. 12 (1897). On the sources of her fiction; she lived in Gloucester, Massachusetts.)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
  • 12.
    It might be that some day I shall be drowned by the sea, or die of pneumonia from sleeping out at night, or be robbed and strangled by strangers. These things happen. Even so, I shall be ahead because of trusting the beach, the night and strangers.
    (Janet Wood Reno (b. 1913), U.S. mother of U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno. As quoted in the New York Times Magazine, p. 44 (May 15, 1994). Reno had "once walked 104 miles up the Florida coast alone.")
    More quotations from: Janet Wood Reno, beach, night, sea
  • 13.
    Total physical and mental inertia are highly agreeable, much more so than we allow ourselves to imagine. A beach not only permits such inertia but enforces it, thus neatly eliminating all problems of guilt. It is now the only place in our overly active world that does.
    (John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. repr. In A View from the Stands (1986). Foreword to Gloria Steinem, The Beach Book (1963).)
  • 14.
    The places which I have described may seem strange and remote to my townsmen ... our account may have made no impression on your minds. But what is our account? In it there is no roar, no beach-birds, no tow-cloth.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 269, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, beach
  • 15.
    The Great South Beach of Long Island,... though wild and desolate, as it wants the bold bank,... possesses but half the grandeur of Cape Cod in my eyes, nor is the imagination contented with its southern aspect.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 270, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 16.
    Again we took to the beach for another day (October 13), walking along the shore of the resounding sea, determined to get it into us. We wished to associate with the ocean until it lost the pond-like look which it wears to a countryman.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 177, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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