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Quotations About / On: BABY

  • 41.
    It is a pleasant thing to reflect upon, and furnishes a complete answer to those who contend for the gradual degeneration of the human species, that every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last.
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 36 (1838-1839).)
    More quotations from: Charles Dickens, baby, world
  • 42.
    In a world that holds books and babies and canyon trails, why should one condemn oneself to live day-in, day-out with people one does not like, and sell oneself to chaperone and correct them?
    (Ruth Benedict (1887-1948), U.S. anthropologist. An Anthropologist at Work, part 2 (1959). Written in her journal on May 20, 1913, during her brief career as a boarding-school teacher.)
    More quotations from: Ruth Benedict, people, world
  • 43.
    In the best of all possible worlds, childbirth enriches a marriage. In the worst, it harms it. No matter how good their marriage is, most couples find that having a baby challenges their relationship.
    (Jean Marzollo (20th century), U.S. author. Your Maternity Leave, ch. 5 (1989).)
    More quotations from: Jean Marzollo, marriage, baby
  • 44.
    The myths about what we're supposed to feel as new mothers run strong and deep. . . . While joy and elation are surely present after a new baby has entered our lives, it is also within the realm of possibility that other feelings might crop up: neediness, fear, ambivalence, anger.
    (Sally Placksin (20th century), U.S. writer and producer. Mothering the New Mother, ch. 1 (1994).)
  • 45.
    Good guilt is a product of love and responsibility. It is a natural, positive instinct that parents and good child care providers have. If bad guilt is a monster, good guilt is a friendly fairy godmother, yakking away in your head to keep you alert to the needs of your baby.
    (Jean Marzollo (20th century), U.S. author. Your Maternity Leave, ch. 3 (1989).)
  • 46.
    We have not all had the good fortune to be ladies. We have not all been generals, or poets, or statesmen; but when the toast works down to the babies, we stand on common ground.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. speech, Nov. 1879. "The Babies," Mark Twain's Speeches, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1923). Twain spoke at a banquet in which the fifteenth toast was, "The babies—as they comfort us in our sorrows, let us not forget them in our festivities.")
  • 47.
    I'm a Nova Scotia bluenose. Since I was a baby, I've been watching men look at ships. It's easy to tell the ones they like. You're only waiting to get her into deep water, aren't you—because she's yours.
    (John Rhodes Sturdy, Canadian screenwriter. Richard Rossen. Joyce Cartwright (Ella Raines), Corvette K-225, to the captain looking at his ship (1943).)
    More quotations from: John Rhodes Sturdy, baby, water
  • 48.
    I think that carrying a baby inside of you is like running as fast as you can. It feels like finally letting go and filling yourself up to the widest limits.
    (Anonymous Mother. Ourselves and Our Children, by Boston Women's Health Book Collective, ch. 2 (1978).)
    More quotations from: Anonymous Mother, running, baby
  • 49.
    Except that right side up is best, there is not much to learn about holding a baby. There are one hundred and fifty-two distinctly different ways—and all are right! At least all will do.
    (Heywood Broun (1888-1939), U.S. journalist, novelist. "Holding a Baby," Seeing Things at Night (1921).)
    More quotations from: Heywood Broun, baby
  • 50.
    A father is always making his baby into a little woman. And when she is a woman he turns her back again.
    (Enid Bagnold (1889-1981), British novelist, playwright. Autobiography, ch. 4 (1969).)
    More quotations from: Enid Bagnold, baby, woman, father
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